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I am trying to run a command from a bash script. The command itself has single quotes in it, but I can't get them to work as there are variables inside the single quotes that need to be expanded. Here is the bash script:

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$2" == "PracSci" ];
then
    echo "Running tabulate.science.r"
    R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args $1 $2 $3' tabulate.science.r /dev/tty
else
    echo "Running tabulate.r"
    R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args $1 $2 $3' tabulate.r /dev/tty
fi

When run as ./script.sh 2 Vocab May12 for example, the command itself is run without the variables values.

How can I expand the variables while still getting the command to run?

Just to be clear, the command I am trying to run is: R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args $1 $2 $3' tabulate.r /dev/tty (including the single quotes in the command).

Thank you!

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1  
I'm skeptical that you need single quotes. When you run this command from the shell, the shell consumes them and passes a single unquoted word to the R command. –  glenn jackman May 17 '12 at 15:14
    
@glennjackman You definitely need the quotes. Running it without the quotes produces nothing. I can't explain it, but I've tried it. –  Jeff Erickson May 17 '12 at 15:30
1  
I agree with @glenn jackman; you may need quotes of some sort, but the point of the quotes is to change how the shell parses its contents -- they're invisible to the program itself. For example, somecmd '--args part1 part2 part3' runs somecmd with exactly the same arguments as somecmd "--args part1 part2 part3" and somecmd --args' 'part1' 'part2' 'part3' and somecmd --args\ part1\ part2\ part3. In all these cases, what the quotes/escapes do is make the shell treat the spaces as part of a single argument rather than delimiters between arguments. –  Gordon Davisson May 17 '12 at 15:37
    
@GordonDavisson The backslash solution you outlined worked! Thank you! It was ideal because the problem seemed to be with whether or not the quotes - or something combination of single and double quotes - was actually being part of the executed command. If you write up your answer as a formal answer, I will accept it. Thanks again. –  Jeff Erickson May 17 '12 at 16:40
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Short answer: use double-quotes instead of single-quotes (as @Pavel suggested). And when in doubt, use set -x to find out how the shell is parsing your commands.

Long answer: quotes aren't passed to the command; instead, they are parsed (and removed) by the shell, before the arguments are passed to the command. What they do is to change the way the shell parses what's inside the quotes (generally by suppressing the special meanings of some characters), which means that you need to choose the appropriate quotes to allow the special characters you want parsed, and suppress the ones you want treated as just plain characters. For instance, consider the following command:

R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args 2 Vocab May12' tabulate.r /dev/tty

The shell will ignore the special meanings of all characters in the single-quoted section of the command. The only characters with any special meaning there are the spaces, which normally act as separators between arguments; in this case, the single-quotes make the shell treat them as part of a single argument. These other commands:

R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave "--args 2 Vocab May12" tabulate.r /dev/tty
R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave --args' '2' 'Vocab' 'May12 tabulate.r /dev/tty
R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave --args\ 2\ Vocab\ May12 tabulate.r /dev/tty

...all do exactly the same thing, because they all (one way or another) get the shell to treat the spaces as part of an argument, rather than separators between arguments.

Now, let's look at the command that isn't working for you:

R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args $1 $2 $3' tabulate.r /dev/tty

The problem is that while the single-quotes are suppressing the special meaning of the spaces (as you want), they're also suppressing the special meaning of the $s (which you don't want). So you need something more selective. One option would be to quote/escape the spaces but leave the $1 etc unquoted:

R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave --args' '$1' '$2' '$3 tabulate.r /dev/tty
R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave --args\ $1\ $2\ $3 tabulate.r /dev/tty

(note that both of these commands do exactly the same thing.) These would mostly work, but have a bit of a potential for trouble: the shell will replace $1 etc with the arguments to the script, but then it does some additional parsing on them: looking for spaces to use as argument separators, wildcards to do filename matching on, etc. All things I'm pretty sure you don't want -- although since the arguments probably won't contain any special characters this probably won't be an issue. Probably.

The best option I see is to simply use double-quotes:

R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave "--args $1 $2 $3" tabulate.r /dev/tty

Double-quotes suppress the special meaning of spaces(as you want), allow $ to trigger variable expansion (also as you want), BUT prevent any further parsing once the variables have been expanded (also probably what you want). Spaces or other funny characters in arguments might still cause trouble within the R script, but at least this prevents them from causing trouble before the R script is even started.

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you can use "(double-quote) instead or closing ' with ' i.e.

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$2" == "PracSci" ];
then
    echo "Running tabulate.science.r"
    R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args '$1' '$2' '$3 tabulate.science.r /dev/tty
else
    echo "Running tabulate.r"
    R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave '--args '$1' '$2' '$3 tabulate.r /dev/tty
fi

Or if you need args ... in a single quote again then simply write

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$2" == "PracSci" ];
then
    echo "Running tabulate.science.r"
    R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave "'--args $1 $2 $3'" tabulate.science.r /dev/tty
else
    echo "Running tabulate.r"
    R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave "'--args $1 $2 $3'" tabulate.r /dev/tty
fi
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Purged the rolling debug session. –  casperOne May 18 '12 at 13:53
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If I understand you correctly, you want " '--args $1 $2 $3' " instead of plain '--args $1 $2 $3'. Since the top-level token is a double-quoted string, the variables will be expanded, and the ' will stay in the token as well to that R can use them.

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Probably not; with the single quotes inside the double quotes, the child process would (probably) see the single quotes, which probably isn't what's required. Replacing the single quotes by double quotes would work. –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '12 at 14:37
    
Neither of these suggestions seem to work. Both of them cause the echo to occur, and then the script to end without anything from the R command. –  Jeff Erickson May 17 '12 at 14:44
    
Using set -x, the output for this line using your suggestion is: ++ R CMD BATCH --no-save --no-restore --slave ' '\''--args 2 Vocab May12'\'' ' tabulate.r /dev/tty –  Jeff Erickson May 17 '12 at 14:56
    
@JeffErickson, \ cannot escape ' character inside of a single quote, you should use " which has ' inside of it, instead. –  Yasser Zamani May 17 '12 at 15:50
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use double quotes - or am I missing the point?

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I think you're missing the point that the single quotes need to be in the actual executed command. Please see my revision of the question. Thanks! –  Jeff Erickson May 17 '12 at 14:44
    
Then Kilian Foth's suggestions is the way to go. Put "set -x" at the beginning of your script to see what's happening at runtime. –  Pavel May 17 '12 at 14:50
    
I tried his suggestion, please see my commend on his post for the output. –  Jeff Erickson May 17 '12 at 14:57
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