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I'm trying to break/return false if a $.post() response is null, by doing so:

....

$('#order_list li > div').remove(); // is to remove `no_data` or `search_box` when clicking on the next `li`

$.post('do.php', { OP: "news_search", category: cat_id },
  function(data_response){
    console.log(data_response); //outputs null if nothing retrieved, or data if otherwise 
    if(data_response==null) //stop code if the response is null
    {
      alert('if works');
      $(this).append(no_data).show('slow');
      return false; // doesn't do the trick
    }
  }, "json");

//if not null, continue with this

if( ! $('.search_box').exists())
{
  $(this).append(search_box).show('slow');
}

....

But as you could read, my code doesn't do the trick. Any ideas?

UPDATE

the if(data_response==null) works, it's the return false that doesn't do its job

share|improve this question
    
What does console.log(data_response) output? –  Jonathan Sampson May 17 '12 at 16:05
    
Also, what does console.log(typeof data_response) output? –  John Himmelman May 17 '12 at 16:06
    
//outputs null if nothing retrieved, or data if otherwise –  w0rldart May 17 '12 at 16:06
    
When doing this I prefer to print something, for example, in my php if some error happens I use print(0); and if everything is ok I use print(1); then in my response I use: if(data != 0) means Ok. –  Oscar Jara May 17 '12 at 16:10
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
$.post('do.php', { OP: "news_search", category: cat_id },
  function(data_response){
    console.log(data_response);  
    if(data_response)
    {
      $(this).append(no_data).show('slow');
       // return false; NOT NEEDED
    } else {
      // below condition should remain here, not outside of Ajax
      if( ! $('.search_box').exists()){
        $(this).append(search_box).show('slow');
      }
    }
  }, "json");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This seems to be a correct fix. –  kapa May 17 '12 at 16:27
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The A in AJAX is for Asynchronous.

When you get to the point where you want to check, it has already executed.

First you run this code:

$.post('do.php', { OP: "news_search", category: cat_id }, callback, "json");

This issues an XmlHttpRequest to the server. I intentionally wrote only callback, because the function is just passed as a parameter. It will only run when the server responded. By that time, the other parts of your code have already run.

  1. $.post() - call to the server
  2. the rest of your code
  3. when the server responded, your callback
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry sir for my lack of knowledge, but, what is that supposed to mean? –  w0rldart May 17 '12 at 16:10
    
@w0rldart Sorry, I was distracted while writing the answer. Look at it now. –  kapa May 17 '12 at 16:15
2  
It means, that when you execute a line of code, it doesn't nessecarily mean that the next line of code will be executed next, and the next one after that. AJAX is asynchronus, meaning there can be code that is executed later than the place it has in your file. –  Hidde May 17 '12 at 16:16
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People usually verify doing the following:

if (foo == null) {
   foo = "Joe";
}

When what they really mean is

if (!foo) {
   foo = "Joe";
}

Its because null is an object and == does type coercion.

More info in this article: JavaScript undefined vs. null

share|improve this answer
    
Be careful, !foo will return true for every falsy value, including 0 and '', not just undefined and null. –  kapa May 17 '12 at 16:34
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