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I'm trying to create prime number generator in one-line of Python just as a fun exercise.

The following code works as expected, but it is too slow:

primes = lambda q: (i for i in xrange(1,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(1,i) for k in xrange(1,i)])
for i in primes(10):
   print i,

So I I tried to do it by only checking up to the square-root of j and k:

primes = lambda q: (i for i in xrange(1,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(1,int(round(math.sqrt(i)+1))) for k in xrange(1,int(round(math.sqrt(i)+1)))])
for i in primes(10):
   print i,

But it outputs: 2 3 5 6 7 8

So there must be something wrong with my indices j and k, but I haven't got a clue.

share|improve this question
    
If you can live with a non-oneliner, there is this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/567222/… –  Andy May 17 '12 at 16:44
    
possible duplicate of Python- Sieve of Eratosthenes- Compact Python –  ninjagecko May 17 '12 at 16:52
2  
I was able to do it in two lines: stackoverflow.com/a/9302299/5987 –  Mark Ransom May 17 '12 at 16:54
    
You could always take advantage of the fact that you CAN refer to the list currently being built inside of a list comprehension by using the expression locals['_[1]']. –  APerson Apr 18 '13 at 12:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That's not the Sieve of Eratosthenes, even though it looks like it is. It is in fact much worse. The Sieve is the best algorithm for finding primes.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes

edit: I've modified http://stackoverflow.com/a/9302299/711085 to be a one-liner (originally it was not the real Sieve, but now it is... probably...):

reduce( (lambda r,x: r-set(range(x**2,N,x)) if (x in r) else r), 
        range(2,N), set(range(2,N)))

Demo:

>>> primesUpTo(N): lambda N: reduce(...)
>>> primesUpTo(30)
{2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19}

Sadly I think that while this would be efficient in a functional programming language, it might not be as efficient in python due to non-persistent (shared-state and immutable) data structures, and any sieve in python would need to use mutation to achieve comparable performance. Even though mutation is the root of all evil, we can still cram it into a one-liner if we desperately wanted to. But first...

Normal sieve:

>>> N = 100
>>> table = list(range(N))
>>> for i in range(2,int(N**0.5)+1):
...     if table[i]:
...         for mult in range(i**2,N,i):
...             table[mult] = False
... 
>>> primes = [p for p in table if p][1:]
>>> primes
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97]

We can now define and call anonymous functions on the same line, as well as the hack of [...].__setitem__ to do inline mutation, and the hack of ... and foo to evaluate ... while returning foo:

>>> primesUpTo = lambda N: (lambda table: [[table.__setitem__(mult,False) for mult in range(i**2,N,i)] for i in range(2,int(N**0.5)+1) if table[i]] and [p for p in table if p][1:])(list(range(N)))
>>> primesUpTo(30)
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29]

Proceed to cringe in horror, the one-liner expanded (oddly beautiful because you could almost directly translate the control flow, yet a terrible abuse of everything):

lambda N:
    (lambda table: 
        [[table.__setitem__(mult,False) for mult in range(i**2,N,i)] 
            for i in range(2,int(N**0.5)+1) if table[i]] 
        and [p for p in table if p][1:]
    )(list(range(N)))

This one-liner mutating version gave up at around 108 on my machine, while the original mutating version gave up at around 109, running out of memory (oddly).

The original reduce version gave up at 107. So perhaps it is not that inefficient after all (at least for numbers you can deal with on your computer).

edit2 It seems you can abuse side-effects more concisely as:

reduce( (lambda r,x: (r.difference_update(range(x**2,N,x)) or r)
                     if (x in r) else r), 
        range(2,N), set(range(2,N)))

It gives up at around 108, the same as the one-liner mutating version.

edit3: This runs at O(N) empirical complexity, whereas without the difference_update it ran at O(n^2.2) complexity.

Limiting the range that is reduced over, to the sqrt of the upper limit, and working with odds only, both result in additional speed-ups (2x and 1.6x correspondingly):

reduce( (lambda r,x: (r.difference_update(range(x*x,N,2*x)) or r)
                     if (x in r) else r), 
        range(3, int((N+1)**0.5+1), 2),
        set([2] + range(3,N,2)))
share|improve this answer
    
True, but this doesn't address the bug in his one-liner. –  David Robinson May 17 '12 at 16:52
    
@DavidRobinson: he seemed explicitly a lot more concerned about the speed of his answer, which is directly related to the algorithm. Lookalike algorithms will begin to feel slow at maybe 10000+, and fail at 1000000+. Anyway, I've since edited my answer to give a real one-liner. –  ninjagecko May 17 '12 at 17:18
1  
(if anyone is wondering why I keep editing/unediting, it's because it's extremely difficult to tell if an unorthodox implementation of the Sieve actually has a running time of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… ; still even now making sure... sadly I think that while this would be efficient in a functional programming language, it is not efficient in python due to non-shared data structures, and any sieve in python would need to use mutation) –  ninjagecko May 17 '12 at 17:35
    
Actually better sieves exist for finding primes. I believe that the current champ is the sieve of Atkins. But Eratosthenes is good enough for virtually anything that you want. –  btilly May 17 '12 at 18:19
1  
@MarkRansom no, that is what the true Sieve of Eratosthenes does, it does remove multiples several times - once for each of the number's prime factors. That's because it doesn't "remove" them, when working with arrays - it marks them off. To remove an entry from array would break up the random access which is the key to sieve's efficiency - each mark-off takes O(1) time. With sets, it is probably O(log(size-of-set)), so worse a bit. And the improvement of crossing-off range(i**2,N,2*i) does warrant an edit, IMHO (esp. w/ sets). :) (notice, it's 2*i when working with odds only). –  Will Ness May 18 '12 at 12:12

You can't check products of numbers only up to the square root to test for a prime. Look at 8- the square root of 8 is 2.8, so it will never try 4 * 2. (Indeed, the only numbers that wouldn't be seen as primes are square numbers).

ETA: Instead of trying all possible combinations of j and k, why not check if i is divisible by each j (using i % j == 0) up to the square root of j? This both takes less code and is much more efficient (though it is still not nearly as efficient as the Sieve of Eratosthenes).

share|improve this answer

Here's what you wanted:

def primes (q) :
 # return (i for i in xrange(2,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(1,i) for k in xrange(1,i)])
 # return (i for i in xrange(2,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(1,i) for k in xrange(1,j+1)])
 # return (i for i in xrange(2,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(1,i/2+1) for k in xrange(1,j+1)])

 return (i for i in xrange(2,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(1,i/2+1) for k in xrange(1,min(j+1,i/j+1))])

In Haskell, the ranges are inclusive, so primes(542) is

[n | n<-[2..541], not $ elem n [j*k | j<-[1..n-1],     k<-[1..n-1]]]  --  25.66s
[n | n<-[2..541], not $ elem n [j*k | j<-[1..n-1],     k<-[1..j]]]    --  15.30s
[n | n<-[2..541], not $ elem n [j*k | j<-[1..n`div`2], k<-[1..j]]]    --   6.00s
                                                                      --   0.79s
[n | n<-[2..541], not $ elem n [j*k | j<-[1..n`div`2], k<-[1..min j (n`div`j)]]] 

And actually, 1*x == x so 1 isn't needed as a multiplier, thus it should be

[n | n<-[2..541], not $ elem n [j*k | j<-[2..n`div`2], k<-[2..min j (n`div`j)]]] 

which takes only 0.59 seconds. Or, in Python,

def primes (q) :
 return (i for i in xrange(2,q) if i not in [j*k for j in xrange(2,i/2+1) for k in xrange(2,min(j+1,i/j+1))])
share|improve this answer

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