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Could someone please give me a example of a function that would use this data type:

function :: Num b => b -> a -> [a]
function a b = ...

Also ideally a would be a string.

No this is not homework xD I just need an example for a project.

I have tried take b (repeat a) but I get the error

Could not deduce (b ~ Int)
from the context (Num b)
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Is this homework? –  chepner May 17 '12 at 17:07
1  
This signature doesn't make much sense for the task you'd like it to fulfill. What is function 7.3 "foo" supposed to return? –  leftaroundabout May 17 '12 at 18:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This would work (it's a function that fits the type description):

function :: Num b => b -> a -> [a]
function arg1 arg2 = [arg2]
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Or also function _ _ = []. –  Vitus May 17 '12 at 20:25
    
Simple but effective xD –  Vierafae Baernera May 17 '12 at 22:34

You could repeat the given element (of type a) b times to create the list

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I have tried take b (repeat a) but I get the error Could not deduce (b ~ Int) from the context (Num b) –  Vierafae Baernera May 17 '12 at 17:08
    
take takes an Int, so you would have to explicitly convert the Num to Int. On second thought, Num could be a floating point number as well, so at that point you need to re-think what repeating something b times means (e.g. round it first) –  Attila May 17 '12 at 17:16

The Prelude provides a number of functions (like take, drop, !!, splitAt, and so forth) that are needlessly monomorphic: they require that the number they're given is an Int. The module Data.List exports more polymorphic versions of these functions which take an argument of any type in the Integral class; they have the same name, but are prefixed by generic. So, instead of take a (repeat b), you may try

function a b = genericTake a (repeat b)
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The generic... functions take any type of the Integral class, which makes much more sense than Num. –  leftaroundabout May 17 '12 at 18:27
    
@leftaroundabout Thanks for the correction. –  Daniel Wagner May 17 '12 at 21:43

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