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The following concurrency code, made using Java's Semaphore class, enters a deadlock, even tough, as per console output, the permit is being released.

package ThreadTraining;

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;

public class ThreadTraining {

    public static class Value {

        private static int value = 0;
        private static final Semaphore SEMAPHORE = new Semaphore(1);

        public static synchronized void acquire() throws InterruptedException {
            SEMAPHORE.acquire();
            System.out.println("A thread has aquired a permit!");
        }

        public static synchronized void release() {
            SEMAPHORE.release();
        }

        public static int get() {
            return value;
        }

        public static void add() {
            value++;
        }

        public static void subtract() {
            value--;
        }
    }

    public static class Adder extends Thread {

        public Adder(String name) {
            this.setName(name);
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.println(this.getName() + " has been created.");
            boolean keepRunning = true;
            while (keepRunning) {
                try {
                    Value.acquire();
                    System.out.print(this.getName() + " has aquired Value's permit. --- ");
                    if (Value.get() > 99) {
                        System.out.print(this.getName() + " has finished it's job. --- ");
                        keepRunning = false;
                    } else {
                        System.out.print(this.getName() + " has modified value from " + Value.get() + "  to ");
                        Value.add();
                        System.out.println(Value.get() + ".");
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
                    System.err.println("This thread was interrupted.");
                } finally {
                    System.out.println(this.getName() + " is releasing Value's permit.");
                    Value.release();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread threads[] = new Thread[3];
        for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
            threads[i] = new Adder("[Adder]Thread #" + i);
        }
        for (Thread t : threads) {
            t.start();
        }
    }
}

The code's console output: (This was a "lucky" run, it usually only prints up to the indicated point)

[Adder]Thread #0 has been created.
[Adder]Thread #1 has been created.
[Adder]Thread #2 has been created.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 0  to 1.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit. /*NOTE: It usually prints only up to this line, hanging after the first permit-release.*/
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 1  to 2.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 2  to 3.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 3  to 4.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 4  to 5.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 5  to 6.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 6  to 7.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.
A thread has aquired a permit!
[Adder]Thread #0 has aquired Value's permit. --- [Adder]Thread #0 has modified value from 7  to 8.
[Adder]Thread #0 is releasing Value's permit.

What are the reasons behind it? And, if possible, how to fix it?


Additional info:

This question is a "continuation" of my previous concurrency question.

The new code is very based on this semaphore tutorial.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is the synchronization of your own methods. Both Value.acquire and Value.release are synchronized, so one thread entering your acquire-method will block another one from calling release, because the release call will wait for the Value-class's monitor to be released, while the one inside acquire will wait for the internal Semaphore to be acquired. Remove the synchronized -keywords from your methods and you'll get rid of the deadlock-problem. Instead, you probably meant to synchronize your get-, add- and subtract-methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, but wouldn't removing the [synchronized] from the aquire() method create a chance that multiple threads call it at the same time? I removed from the released() method only, and it seems to have worked out. –  TheLima May 17 '12 at 17:53
    
It won't matter if multiple threads call your acquire-method simultaneously, as the Semaphore's acquire will only allow the maximum number of permits to be acquired (in your case 1), and when they run out, the other threads will block until the required amount of permits are available (there's an overload to Semaphores' acquire with which you can acquire more than one permit at a time). Since you're only allowing one permit in the semaphore, it acts similarly as a mutex. See docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… for details. –  esaj May 17 '12 at 18:05
    
I am worried that the internal mechanisms of the Semaphore might allow for a thread-race scenario. For example, if a second thread (internally) acquires the permit that was already acquired by the first thread, before the Semaphore (internally) sets that permit to "no longer acquireable". My last question before this one provides a good example of such scenario (and it's consequences in the output). It's probably not the case tough. –  TheLima May 17 '12 at 20:26
1  
@TheLima: if the classes in java.util.concurrent weren't inherently thread-safe already, I'd be in deep trouble by now ;) Meaning, Semaphores are built for the purpose of thread synchronization. If a Semaphore itself has an internal race-condition, there's something really badly wrong in the standard libraries of Java. –  esaj May 17 '12 at 20:32

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