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I'd like to inject my service in Groovy/src class. The normaln dependency injection doesn't work:

...
def myService
...

I'm able to use this (it works):

def appCtx = ApplicationHolder.application.getMainContext()
def myService = appCtx.getBean("myService");

but the ApplicationHolder is deprecated. Is there any better solution?

Thanks for any suggestion

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How do you use this 'src class'? Where and how you instantiate it? – Igor Artamonov May 17 '12 at 17:45
    
I use it inside of other Groovy classes (it is instantiated there). There is a facade groovy class which is used by a service what triggers all that procedures. I don't want to pass used service as parameters in order not to pass so much parameters... – kuceram May 23 '12 at 8:22
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Check following Grails FAQ to get access to the application context from sources in src/groovy - http://grails.org/FAQ#Q: How do I get access to the application context from sources in src/groovy?

There is no ApplicationContextHolder class equivalent to ApplicationHolder. To access to a service class called EmailService from a Groovy class in src/groovy, access the Spring bean using:

import org.codehaus.groovy.grails.web.context.ServletContextHolder as SCH
import org.codehaus.groovy.grails.web.servlet.GrailsApplicationAttributes as GA
def ctx = SCH.servletContext.getAttribute(GA.APPLICATION_CONTEXT)
def emailService = ctx.emailService
share|improve this answer
1  
While this will allow you to access methods in a service, it will break the services transactionallity. Excerpt from Declarative Transactions: Warning: dependency injection is the only way that declarative transactions work. You will not get a transactional service if you use the new operator such as new BookService() – ubiquibacon Aug 9 '13 at 15:23
3  
@ubiquibacon - yes but "def emailService = ctx.emailService" will be a transactional service.I am sorry but what is the issue with accessing service like this? – Saurabh Aug 9 '13 at 18:16
    
I don't think that qualifies as "dependency injection". I'll have to do some testing to verify that though. – ubiquibacon Aug 9 '13 at 18:20
    
@ubiquibacon what is the result of the investigation? – biniam_Ethiopia Jul 14 '15 at 8:00

The replacement of ApplicationHolder can de Holders, you can also use it in static scope:

import grails.util.Holders
...

def myService = Holders.grailsApplication.mainContext.getBean 'myService'
share|improve this answer
    
works in Grails 3.0 too! – boraas Aug 25 '15 at 10:04

You can easily register new (or override existing) beans by configuring them in grails-app/conf/spring/resources.groovy:

// src/groovy/com/example/MyClass.groovy
class MyClass {
    def myService
    ...
}

// resources.groovy
beans = {
    myclass(com.example.MyClass) {
        myService = ref('myService')
    }
}

Also you can check this question about How to access Grails configuration in Grails 2.0?

share|improve this answer
    
Now I see that this doesn't work for me. I cannot bind a service or other properties in resources.groovy like this: ` import com.path.to.ResidentAtPlace beans = { residentAtPlaceBean(ResidentAtPlace) { someProperty = 45 placeService = ref('placeService') grailsApplication = ref('grailsApplication') } } ` Everything is null in my ResidentAtPlace.groovy Do you see any problem? I'm using Grail 2.0.3 – kuceram May 18 '12 at 12:12
    
the same happens to me, any idea why? – mathifonseca Apr 11 '14 at 21:14

Yo can do it from the resources.groovy:

// src/groovy/com/example/MyClass.groovy
class MyClass {
    def myService
    ...
}

// resources.groovy
beans = {
    myclass(com.example.MyClass) {
        myService = ref('myService')
    }
}

or just using the autowired anotation:

// src/groovy/com/example/MyClass.groovy

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired

class MyClass {
    @Autowired 
    def myService
    ...
}

// resources.groovy
beans = {
    myclass(com.example.MyClass) {}
}
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