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Because I can't find a convenient way to check if $str is in @array, I'm trying to make one myself, but it is not working.

I guess it is because of the mix-up of array and string. It keeps giving 0 to $str. Please let me know how to fix it.

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub ifin {
    my (@array, $str) = @_;
    for my $i (@array) {
        if ($i eq $str) {
            return 1;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

my @f = (1, 2, 3, 4);
my $k = 1;
print ifin(@f, $k);
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1  
Couldn't you get around this by swapping the parameters round, and passing in the string first and then the array? –  andrewsi May 17 '12 at 18:11
1  
    
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5 Answers

You can't pass arrays to subs, only lists of scalars.

ifin(@f, $k);

is the same as

ifin($f[0], $f[1], $f[2], $f[3], $k);

because @f evaluates to a list of its elements.

One way of passing an array to a sub is to pass a reference.

sub ifin {
   my ($array, $str) = @_;
   for my $e (@$array) {
      return 1 if $e eq $str;
   }

   return 0;
}

my @f = (1,2,3,4);
my $k = 1;
print(ifin(\@f, $k), "\n");

By the way, that can also be written as:

my @f = (1,2,3,4);
my $k = 1;
print(( grep { $_ eq $k } @f ) ? 1 : 0, "\n");

You could keep the existing calling convention by using pop.

sub ifin {
   my $str = pop(@_);
   for my $e (@_) {
      return 1 if $e eq $str;
   }

   return 0;
}

my @f = (1,2,3,4);
my $k = 1;
print(ifin(@f, $k), "\n");
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$i is usually used for indexes, so I used $e (for "element"). –  ikegami May 17 '12 at 18:08
    
Added alternative that allows you to keep the currentl calling convention. –  ikegami May 17 '12 at 18:36
    
This is very helpful, thanks –  Ivan Wang May 17 '12 at 18:48
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You may want to check any in the List::MoreUtils package, you just use it like:

use List::MoreUtils 'any';

my @f= qw(1 2 3 4);
my $k=10;

print "yes\n" if( any { $_ == $k } @f );

check the documentation in:

perldoc List::MoreUtils.
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How about $str ~~ @arr in a smartmatch? That's available in Perl 5.10.

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

my $str = 'three';
my @arr = qw(zero one two three four);
my @badarr = qw(zero one two four eight);

say '$str ', $str ~~ @arr? 'is' : 'is not', ' in $arr.';
say '$str ', $str ~~ @badarr? 'is' : 'is not', ' in $badarr.';

Output, as expected:

$str is in $arr.
$str is not in $badarr.
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You could use a prototype, but those are kind of brittle. I would pass in a reference to @f as the first argument, like this:

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub ifin
{
my ($array,$str)=@_;
 for my $i (@$array)
 {
  if ($i eq $str)
  {
   return True
  }
 }
 return False
}


my @f= (1,2,3,4);
my $k=1;
print ifin(\@f,$k);

For a long list, you avoid making a copy of every list element as well.

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Technically, you are still passing a reference even if you have the prototype do the referencing for you :) –  ikegami May 17 '12 at 18:08
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You could pass your arguments in reverse order (print ifin($k, @f);), so array is going last. When you catch them now from subroutine, string comes first and array gets populated with any list items after it.

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