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I have the following class:

template <typename T>
class Fixed2DContainer {

    T* ptr;

public:
    const int total_cols;
    const int total_rows;

    Fixed2DContainer(int cols, int rows);
    T& operator()(int col_n, int row_n);
    ~Fixed2DContainer();

private : //disallow copy
    Fixed2DContainer& operator=(const Fixed2DContainer&);
    Fixed2DContainer operator()(const Fixed2DContainer&);
};

Now I'd like to specialize this template for some class so that the only change is that I can have an another constructor. Basically I want to be able to do:

Fixed2DContainer<Image>("filename.jpg");

is there an elegant way to do this? I am fairly new to template so i have no idea of the difficulty

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No, you can't do that simply. You have to write the whole class out again as a specialization and add the new constructor. You could move most of the functionality out to a separate base class which the primary template and the specialization both use, to avoid repeating it all, but a most of your "functionality" seems to be constructors and copy operations they would need to be re-implemented anyway. The ptr and total_cols/total_rows members could be in the common base, but you might not end up with much work saved once you've added constructors etc to the base –  Jonathan Wakely May 17 '12 at 18:15
    
This looks like a job for good old OO, not template specializations. –  n.m. May 17 '12 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a quick example of what I meant in my earlier comment ...

template <typename T>
class Fixed2DContainerBase {

  T* ptr;

public:
  const int total_cols;
  const int total_rows;

  Fixed2DContainerBase(int cols, int rows);
  T& operator()(int col_n, int row_n);
  ~Fixed2DContainerBase();

private : //disallow copy
  Fixed2DContainerBase& operator=(const Fixed2DContainerBase&);
  Fixed2DContainerBase(const Fixed2DContainerBase&);
};

// primary template
template <typename T>
class Fixed2DContainer : public Fixed2DContainerBase<T> {

  Fixed2DContainer(int cols, int rows);
  ~Fixed2DContainer();
};

// explicit specialization
template <>
class Fixed2DContainer<Image> : public Fixed2DContainerBase<Image> {

  Fixed2DContainer(int cols, int rows);
  Fixed2DContainer(const std::string&);
  ~Fixed2DContainer();
};

N.B. because the base class is non-copyable the derived classes will be too. It may not be necessary to define a destructor in the derived classes if all the cleanup can be done by the base destructor.

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If your compiler supports it, C++11 has inheriting constructors that will pretty much get you where you want to be:

template <typename T>
class Base {};              // has all the implementation

template <typename T>
class Template {
   using Base::Base;
   //Template() = delete;   // You might need this if you don't want
                            // the default constructor
};

template <>
class Template<int> {
   using Base::Base;
   Template( std::string const & x ) {}
   //Template() = delete;   // You might need this if you don't want
                            // the default constructor
};
share|improve this answer

I have had the same problem myself. Unfortunately, every constructor must exist in the generic template. You can avoid people using the wrong constructor at runtime though;

template <typename T>
class Fixed2DContainer {

    // omitted

    Fixed2DContainer(string fileName)
    {
        // Do not allow construction of Fixed2DContainer with
        // string argument in general case
        ASSERT(false);
        // or
        throw new ExceptionType("Not implemented");
    }

    // omitted
};

template<>
class Fixed2DContainer<Image> {

    // omitted

    Fixed2DContainer(string fileName)
    {
        // Actual construction code
    }

    // omitted
};

Asserts are preferred because your code will break on the assert whereas the in the exception case it will break on the catch, making it slightly harder to debug.

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