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When trying to run a python script, I get the error AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'pydebug'. I am using Python 2.6.

Full error:

File "/lib/python2.6/distutils/sysconfig.py", line 238, in get_makefile_filename
    return os.path.join(lib_dir, "config" + (sys.pydebug and "_d" or ""), "Makefile")
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'pydebug'
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What is your code? What line throws the exception? –  David Robinson May 17 '12 at 18:12
    
I updated description –  big May 17 '12 at 18:21
    
In the future you should also provide the code snippet itself. Where did you get this code from? You didn't write it yourself? –  David Robinson May 17 '12 at 18:24
2  
This is most likely not related to the actual script as sysconfig is imported during interpreter startup, before the user script is loaded. I get this error when running anything that embeds Python, which makes gdb on my Ubuntu 12.04 unusable. Some weird configuration problem inside the distribution packages it seems. –  Bluehorn Aug 17 '12 at 17:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think whatever you are trying to run is expecting to be used with a special debug build of python. sys.pydebug is not normally found on the standard release of the sys module, and I believe it would be there if you built a debug python:

http://docs.python.org/c-api/intro.html#debugging-builds

It is possible that this also might be part of a specific build that Debian/Ubuntu distros are using.

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I hit this issue when attempting to run the Ubuntu 12.04.1 system gdb on a python I built myself. I expect Ubuntu has built some hooks into the system gdb so that it uses a debugging version of Python; but the hooks don't latch onto anything in my own python. I got around this by building my own gdb and running that instead.

Here's the command-line and full traceback:

price@neverland:~/LSST/ip_diffim[master] $ gdb --args python tests/SnapPsfMatch.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/site.py", line 562, in <module>
    main()
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/site.py", line 544, in main
    known_paths = addusersitepackages(known_paths)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/site.py", line 271, in addusersitepackages
    user_site = getusersitepackages()
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/site.py", line 246, in getusersitepackages
    user_base = getuserbase() # this will also set USER_BASE
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/site.py", line 236, in getuserbase
    USER_BASE = get_config_var('userbase')
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/sysconfig.py", line 577, in get_config_var
    return get_config_vars().get(name)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/sysconfig.py", line 476, in get_config_vars
    _init_posix(_CONFIG_VARS)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/sysconfig.py", line 337, in _init_posix
    makefile = _get_makefile_filename()
  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/sysconfig.py", line 331, in _get_makefile_filename
    return os.path.join(get_path('platstdlib').replace("/usr/local","/usr",1), "config" + (sys.pydebug and "_d" or ""), "Makefile")
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'pydebug'

so it seems to go looking for the wrong python (in /usr/lib) despite my having told the system not to do so:

price@neverland:~/LSST/ip_diffim[master] $ which python
/home/price/eups/Linux/python/2.7.2/bin/python
price@neverland:~/LSST/ip_diffim[master] $ echo $PYTHONPATH | grep usr
price@neverland:~/LSST/ip_diffim[master] $ 
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This is very likely caused by a wrong python executable lying around in your path. I used strace to find out which one it is (/usr/local/bin/python2.7 in my case), removed it and tried to reinstall python. –  jrudolph Nov 7 '13 at 7:43
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