Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In vb.net, this is serializable:

 <Serializable()>
Class FunctionHolder
    Private _F As Func(Of Double, Double)
    Sub New()
        Me._F = Function(d As Double) d * 5#
    End Sub
End Class

whereas for this serialization fails:

 <Serializable()>
Class FunctionHolder
    Private _F As Func(Of Double, Double)
    Sub New()
        Dim c = 5#
        Me._F = Function(d As Double) d * c
    End Sub
End Class

presumably because referencing the local var c means the lambda expression now has a closure. My knowledge of this is sketchy so please correct me if that's wrong.

So I'm thinking if you want a lambda expression to be serializable, it's best to give them only primitive literals. But my code is such that it would be very difficult to avoid variables altogether when creating lambdas. Is there any way I can use local primitive vars in a lambda expression, but somehow get the expression to "treat" it as simply a literal value, for the purposes of serialization?

share|improve this question
1  
You sure serializing a function is a good idea in the first place...? – Matti Virkkunen May 17 '12 at 18:43
    
well, since the serialization is failing I'm starting to have doubts, but what dangers are you thinking about? These functions are pretty simple in structure. – Tekito May 17 '12 at 19:01
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Usually lambda expressions are compiled as functions within the same class as the function defining them. However, if the lambda expression accesses local variables of the surrounding function, those need to somehow be made available.

The compiler solves that problem by creating a nested type in the class of the function surrounding the lambda expression. That type contains the lambda expression function and instance variables for any local variables the lambda expression uses.

In other words, in order to call a lambda expression that accesses surrounding local variables, you actually create an object that holds copies of those variables. If you want to prevent that (and that might also prevent your serialization problems), you will have to pass the value as parameter to the lambda expression.

edit: That auto-generated nested type probably isn't serializable, but would be required to serialize the delegate.

share|improve this answer
    
Assuming I understand this right... I think that would solve the serialization problem, though seems it could get tedious/unreadable if you need to implement for arbitrary number of parameters- have to keep a list of all param values somewhere and rewrite the lamda expression as a function on that list. – Tekito May 17 '12 at 19:50

For this presumably simplified example, with VB10's multi-statement lambdas, you could recacluate c every time the function is called:

<Serializable()>
Class FunctionHolder
    Private _F As Func(Of Double, Double)
    Sub New()
        Me._F = Function(d As Double)
                  Dim c = 5#
                  Return d * c
                End Function
    End Sub
End Class

(Untested)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea, but in my case I'd still be dealing with variables declared outside the lambda. Even though my example code makes it look easy to put c inside the function, the real code will have to deal with external variables in some fashion. Anyways, I've since given up on this approach. – Tekito Nov 15 '12 at 18:40
    
Yeah, I guessed that you'd "over" simplified. – Mark Hurd Nov 16 '12 at 0:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.