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I have a typedef in an if macro, something like:

#ifdef BLA_BLA
typedef int typeA
#elseif 
typedef double tyeA
#endif
printf("%d" , a); printf("%l" , a);

I am wondering what is the best approach when I write a printf for this case? (%d or %l).

I know I can define a fixed string in the macro as well. But is it the best way?

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1  
"%l" is incorrect; the format for double is "%f", "%g", or "%e", depending on how you want to handle the exponent. –  Keith Thompson May 17 '12 at 21:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do you really want to define a type as either integer or floating-point? They're both numeric, but their behavior is so different in many ways that writing code that works correctly in either case is going to be difficult.

In many cases, you can convert to a type that's wide enough to cover the ranges of both possible types. A simple example:

#include <stdio.h>

#ifdef BLA_BLA
typedef int num_type;
#else
typedef long num_type;
#endif

int main(void) {
    num_type x = 42;
    printf("x = %ld\n", (long)x);
    return 0;
}

More generally, you can convert to intmax_t or uintmax_t, defined in <stdint.h> or <inttypes.h>, using "%jd" or "%ju", respectively.

You can almost do the same thing by converting everything to long double, but that can lose precision for large integer values.

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Use a macro to define the format string too.

#ifdef BLA_BLA
typedef int typeA;
#define FORMAT "%d"
#elseif 
typedef double typeA;
#define FORMAT "%f"
#endif

...
typeA a = ...;
printf("Hello " FORMAT " there", a); printf(FORMAT , a);
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If it were me, I wouldn't pass a typeA argument to printf directly; I'd create another function that returned a string representation of a typeA value, and pass that string to printf (or whatever other function needed to display it).

char *formatTypeA(typeA val, char *buf, size_t len)
{
  #ifdef BLA_BLA
  #define FORMATCHAR d
  #else
  #define FORMATCHAR f
  #endif

  char formatStr[SIZE]; // where SIZE is large enough to handle the longest
                        // possible size_t value plus "%" plus the format
                        // character plus the 0 terminator
  sprintf(formatStr, "%%%zu" FORMATCHAR, len - 1); 
  sprintf(buf, formatStr, val);
  return buf;
}

int main(void)
{
  typeA foo;
  char output[10];
  ...
  printf("foo = %s\n", formatTypeA(foo, output, sizeof output));
  ...
}

There's probably a better way to do that.

EDIT

This is one of the reasons I tend not to use typedefs very often, btw; if the representation matters (such as in this case), then you really don't want to hide that information from whoever's using it.

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Yet another alternative - define a short helper function so you don't have to sprinkle ifdefs everywhere throughout your code:

#ifdef BLA_BLA
typedef int typeA
#else
typedef double typeA
#endif

inline void print_typeA(const typeA val) {
#ifdef BLA_BLA 
  printf("%d" , val); 
#else
  printf("%e" , val);
#endif
}

somefunc()
{ typeA xyz;

  print_typeA(xyz);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Most likely the format string will be longer in the actual application. –  ThiefMaster May 17 '12 at 20:55
    
@ThiefMaster - agreed, however, that suggestion was aimed at not having to #ifdef every time you want to print a value, and was consistent with the OP's example. More complex formatting involving other values and strings would obviously need additional work... –  twalberg May 17 '12 at 21:02

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