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I have a file of type Excel, and I am trying to read it in and create an object with each line and insert it into my Data Structure. I know how to do all of this with a regular text document. Is it the same for Excel files? Where I can just use the first vertical row as the first variable and the 2nd as the second just as I would if I were to read in a text document?

This seems like it is going to be a lot more trouble than it is worth. Is there a way of converting excel to word, without copy and paste? The file is quite big and freezes word when I try to copy and paste.

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In Excel you can save a spreadsheet in text format, for example tab delimited or csv –  Martin Wilson May 17 '12 at 19:41
    
@MartinWilson Thank you. –  Renuz May 17 '12 at 19:44

4 Answers 4

The excel (and most other types) files are binary files, they have it own structure and you must either:

  • know its internal structure in order to reach the content.

  • use an external library API to deal with it (google for java excel api)

You can't just treat as a text file because it is not.

UPDATE: An alternative approach is to use the excel file as an ODBC source and use SQL to access it, if it is regular enough.

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They certainly are different from text files. If you want to be able to treat them as spreadsheets, you'll want a library that can read and interpret them as such.

I'd recommend using something like Andy Khan's JExcel or Apache POI to read Excel files.

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you need to use Apache-POI to read excel files , and that too one cell at a time

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Excel supports a number of files, including CSV, which is a text file.

The most common Excel file ends in an .XLS, which is a binary encoding, which is a fancy way of saying that what you read out of the file is not always text. This means you need to know the structure of the .xls file format, to map the bits at a particular location to a particular meaning.

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