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I thought I figured out a way to simplify my code by using WebClient.UploadFile instead of HttpWebRequest, but I end up getting a file on the server end that is a few dozen bytes too short and corrupted. Any idea where the bug lies?

Thanks

Using HttpWebRequest (works fine):

       HttpWebRequest req = (HttpWebRequest)HttpWebRequest
                                 .Create("http://" +
                                  ConnectionManager.FileServerAddress + ":" +
                                  ConnectionManager.FileServerPort +
                                  "/binary/up/" + category + "/" +  
                                  Path.GetFileName(filename) + "/" + safehash);

        req.Method = "POST";
        req.ContentType = "binary/octet-stream";
        req.AllowWriteStreamBuffering = false;
        req.ContentLength = bytes.Length;
        Stream reqStream = req.GetRequestStream();

        int offset = 0;
        while (offset < ____)
        {
            reqStream.Write(bytes, offset, _________);
             _______
             _______
             _______

        }
        reqStream.Close();

        try
        {
            HttpWebResponse resp = (HttpWebResponse) req.GetResponse();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            _____________
        }
        return safehash;

Using WebClient (corrupt file on server end):

      var client = new WebClient();
      client.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8;
      client.Headers.Add(HttpRequestHeader.ContentType, "binary/octet-stream");

      client.UploadFile(new Uri("http://" +
              ConnectionManager.FileServerAddress + ":" +
              ConnectionManager.FileServerPort +
              "/binary/up/" + category + "/" +
              Path.GetFileName(filename) + "/" + safehash), filename);

      return safehash;

Server side is a WCF service:

  [OperationContract]
    [WebInvoke(Method = "POST", UriTemplate = "up/file/{fileName}/{hash}")]

    void FileUpload(string fileName, string hash, Stream fileStream);
share|improve this question
    
If your target is a WCF service, is there a reason you aren't consuming it as a service, and instead trying to manually post data to it? What kind of file sizes are we talking about uploading here? WCF has some pretty small default file size limits. Are you having a keep-alive or a timeout issue with the WebClient implementation? Are you getting any exceptions on your end? –  Cory May 17 '12 at 20:01
    
If you look at the request in a tool such as Fiddler, does it show any differences between the two? –  carlosfigueira May 17 '12 at 20:14
    
Fiddler.. hmmmm good idea. I will check now. Cory: no issues on either end, just a corrupt file. –  Harry Mexican May 17 '12 at 20:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

WebClient.UploadFile sends the data in a multipart/form-data format. What you want to use to have the equivalent to the code using HttpWebRequest is the WebClient.UploadData method:

var client = new WebClient();
client.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8;
client.Headers[HttpRequestHeader.ContentType] = "application/octet-stream";
byte[] fileContents = File.ReadAllBytes(filename);
client.UploadData(new Uri("http://" + ConnectionManager.FileServerAddress + ":" +
       ConnectionManager.FileServerPort +
       "/binary/up/" + category + "/" +
       Path.GetFileName(filename) + "/" + safehash), fileContents);
share|improve this answer
    
Bingo! I was not expecting such a simple resolution. Thank you. –  Harry Mexican May 17 '12 at 20:46
    
Unfortunately it seems that WebClient.UploadData has a bug in that it does not report the upload progress correctly :(. Guess I'll stick to my custom HttpWebRequest –  Harry Mexican May 18 '12 at 10:01

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