Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Does anyone know what is := for?

I tried googling but it seems google filters all symbol?

I know the below is something like checking if the variable HOME is a directory and then something is not equal to empty string.

  if [ "${HOME:=}" != "" ] && [ -d ${HOME} ]
share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

From Bash Reference Manual:

${parameter:=word}

If parameter is unset or null, the expansion of word is assigned to parameter. The value of parameter is then substituted. Positional parameters and special parameters may not be assigned to in this way.

Basically it will assign the value of word to parameter if and only if parameter is unset or null.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me by one second :) – Jon Skeet Jun 30 '09 at 15:21
    
And me by two ;) – bedwyr Jun 30 '09 at 15:22
    
I've seen := a lot of places. Ussually I read it is "defined by". In C++, C#, Java (+ a hundred other places) := equals =. And when this is true, ussually = equals ==. Wow - that was a subtle point by me. Sorry for being so bad at explaining myself :) – cwap Jun 30 '09 at 16:34
    
@Meeh: As far as I know, this is the only situation where bash uses ":=". For assignment, "=" is used and for equality comparison, either "=" or "==" can be used. Bash also accepts assignment operators like "+=". I'm not sure which operator you're saying C++, etc., use, but it's "=". Languages like Pascal and Ada use ":=" and so might be considered to be rarer. – Dennis Williamson Jul 1 '09 at 4:30

From the Bash man page:

Assign Default Values. If parameter is unset or null, the expansion of word is assigned to parameter. The value of parameter is then substituted. Positional parameters and special parameters may not be assigned to in this way.

Man pages are a wonderful thing. man bash will tell you almost everything you want to know about Bash.

share|improve this answer

Here "${HOME:=}" is a more or less a no-op, since it returns $HOME if it's set and nothing if it's not.

if [ "${HOME:=}" != "" ] && [ -d ${HOME} ]

This would function identically:

if [ "${HOME}" != "" ] && [ -d ${HOME} ]

If you had something after the equal sign, the first part of the if would always be true.

if [ "${HOME:=here}" != "" ] && [ -d ${HOME} ]

whatever happened you'd always get a string that's not equal to "".

However, this would depend on whether $HOME and $DEFAULT were both null:

if [ "${HOME:=$DEFAULT}" != "" ] && [ -d ${HOME} ]
share|improve this answer
    
It's not quite a no-op, since if $HOME is undefined, it will be set to the empty string. – camh Jul 1 '09 at 2:33
    
@camh: In bash, there is virtually no difference between an undefined variable and one with a null value. – Dennis Williamson Jul 1 '09 at 4:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.