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I have a java program, which will run on windows, which I want to run differently, based on if the program is run with administrative privileges, versus if the program is run as a normal user.

I need a solution that is general, which can work for different flavors of java (not just oracle/sun's version).

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See this post and it's answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1834490/… –  Niek Tax May 17 '12 at 21:03
    
I've been looking into this issue for a while, and seem some different approaches. I noticed that I can try to run 'reg query "HKU\S-1-5-19"' from a normal console and will get an error, where when run as administrator, it returns values. I may end up going with this approach unless someone else has a clearer way to detecting access level. –  VenomFangs May 17 '12 at 21:06
    
@NiekTax thanks for the link. That is one of the background links I looked at before posting the question. My particular situation is based around if I'll be able to write to HKLM, either a domain or local admin should be able to do that. I have a solution working using the regkey stuff in my previous comment. I'll post it a while later if no comes up with a more elegant solution. –  VenomFangs May 17 '12 at 23:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I used the reg query approach to determine if the current program is admin access or not. The following should give enough info that you can modify it for your needs.

    try {
        String command = "reg query \"HKU\\S-1-5-19\"";
        Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
        p.waitFor();                            // Wait for for command to finish
        int exitValue = p.exitValue();          // If exit value 0, then admin user.

        if (0 == exitValue) {
            System.out.println("admin user");
        } else {
            System.out.println("non admin user");
        }

    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
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