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I'm fighting with CSS and can't figure out how to remove bullets. Yeah, I know this sounds easy, but hear me out. I have another external CSS file from our corporate office that has styles that are getting in the way and I can't for the life of me figure out how to override them. I've tried the !important token and it doesn't work either. I'm using chrome and the inspector hasn't yet helped me figure out what's causing it. Anyway, here's my code which works great stand-alone, but once I put the corporate CSS file in there, the stupid bullets come back. Ugh!

    <ul style="list-style-type:none;">
        <li>First</li>
        <li>Second</li>
        <li>Third</li>
    </ul>
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Does the corporate CSS have !important? –  SomeKittens May 17 '12 at 21:08
1  
Use Firebug (or similar), inspect the element and it will tell you the sources of the styles defines for that element. –  Diodeus May 17 '12 at 21:10
    
!important is a blunt tool and is usually an indicator that you need to re-factor your CSS. –  Diodeus May 17 '12 at 21:11
    
So <ul style="list-style-type:none !important;"> fails? –  j08691 May 17 '12 at 21:15
    
The corporate CSS doesn't have !important. –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This sounds like more of an issue with CSS specificity. You can't "override" the other styles, per se, you can merely create additional styles which are more specific. Without knowing what the other CSS looks like, there are generally three ways to do this:

Inline styles

Exactly like you have in your example. These are most specific, so they're guaranteed to work, but they're also guaranteed to be a pain in the neck to work with. Generally, if you're using these, something needs to be fixed.

Add an id attribute to the unordered list,

Then use the id as a selector in your CSS. Using an id as a selector is more specific than using a class or an element type. It's a useful tool for cutting through a bunch of styling that you might be inheriting from somewhere else.

<ul id="the-one">
    <li>First</li>
    <li>Second</li>
    <li>Third</li>
</ul>

ul#the-one {
  list-style-type: none;
}

Wrap all of your HTML in a div with the id attribute set.

This is what I usually do. It allows me to use that div with it's id in my CSS styles to make sure my styles always take precedence. Plus, it means I only have to choose one meaningful id name, then I can just style the rest of my HTML as I normally would. Here's an example:

<div id="wrapper">
  <ul>
      <li>First</li>
      <li>Second</li>
      <li>Third</li>
  </ul>
  <p>Some text goes here</p>
</div>

div#wrapper ul {
  list-style-type: none;
}

div#wrapper p {
  text-align: center;
}

Using that technique is a pretty good way to make sure that you spend most of your time working on your own styles and not trying to debug somebody else's. Of course, you have to put div#wrapper at the beginning of each of your styles, but that's what SASS is for.

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1  
Thanks for the quick reply. Unfortunately it didn't work. I tried this with an embedded style sheet in my head tags just like you explained. My html also looks like what you've explained. When I go into Chrome's inspector, the Computed Style shows "list-style-type: none;" and it says the style came from "div#wrapper ul". –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:55
1  
I figure out what the problem was. It was a backgound-image style being used as a bullet in the corporate CSS. Once I found that I was able to apply the necessary background-image:none; style appropriately. Done! Thanks for all of the help. –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 22:38
    
@noctufaber did you apply it to the ul? li? I'm doing it to all of them and it's not working. –  gwho Nov 6 at 10:14

I had the same problem, I was trying to change the CSS for a joomla website, and finally found that the li had a background image that was a bullet... (the template was JAT3). This is the code:

.column ul li {
  background: url(../images/bullet.gif) no-repeat 20px 7px;
  ...
}

Hope it helps someone.

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1  
+1 I've had same issue and this resolved it. –  blue-sky Jan 17 '13 at 12:16
    
+1 I had the same issue with a joomla template language switcher. –  peterincumbria Aug 22 '13 at 11:56
    
+1 I had this problem, putting the list-style-type: none; on the <li> solved it. –  jmsmcfrlnd Nov 25 '13 at 3:08

Ensure the rule you're trying to override is on the UL, rather than the LI. I've seen that rule applied to LIs, and overriding the UL as you have above would have no effect.

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Yes. It's definitely on the UL tag. –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:41

It's better if instead of having the style inline you call it using a class:

<ul class="noBullets">

.noBullets {
list-style-type:none !important;
}

If you can't find the style that's overwriting yours, you can use the !important property. It's better to first inspect your code online using chrome or firefox's Inspect element (or firebug).

EDIT:

Accordnig to your comment, the style comes from div#wrapper ul. Did you try:

div#wrapper ul {
list-style-type:none !important;
}
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I totally agree with you. I'm only putting the CSS inline for demonstration. The problem is our corporate CSS file is preventing my style from asserting itself. –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:43
1  
Yup. Tried the !important property. It doesn't work (at least in this case). –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:44
1  
did you use firebug? It has to tell you what's overwriting it! –  Yisela May 17 '12 at 21:49
    
I'm using Chrome's inspector. It's telling me that the computed style is list-style-type:none; Unfortunately it still has annoying little bullets. –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:57
    
I wish I could put this on the web, but it's for a local intranet. –  noctufaber May 17 '12 at 21:58

My situation is similar to the one described by @fankoil: my inherited css had

main-divname ul li{
  background-image:url('some-image.png');
}

to get rid of this for a specific ul, I gave the ul an id

<ul id="foo">
...

and in the css, turned off background image for this particular ul

ul#foo li {
  background-image: none !important;
}

So to add some clarification to some previous answers:

  • list-style-type is on ul
  • background-image in on li
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