Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm troubleshooting a problem that I have recreated in a solution here.

The issue is that I am using some custom types that can implicitly cast from string to themselves. One of the custom types inherits from the other.

public class CustomType
{
    public string InnerString { get; protected set; }

    public CustomType(string s)
    {
        InnerString = s;
    }

    #region Operator Overloads
    public static implicit operator CustomType(string s)
    {
        if (s == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        return new CustomType(s);
    }
    public static implicit operator string(CustomType value)
    {
        if (value == null)
            return null;
        return value.InnerString;
    }
    #endregion
}


public class SubCustomType : CustomType
{
    public SubCustomType(string s)
        : base(s)
    {
        // Nada
    }

    #region Operator Overloads
    public static implicit operator SubCustomType(string s)
    {
        if (s == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        return new SubCustomType(s);
    }
    public static implicit operator string(SubCustomType value)
    {
        if (value == null)
            return null;
        return value.InnerString;
    }
    #endregion
}

In another generic class, I rely upon the fact that the base custom type can implicitly cast from string to itself. (The cast occurs at the line (T)this.Rtf. .Rtf is a string.) (The generic class is in my case a subclass of RichTextBox, since that's what I was using when I ran into this problem.)

public class CustomRichTextBox<T> : Forms.RichTextBox
    where T : CustomType
{
    public object GetValue()
    {
        /// This line throws:
        /// InvalidCastException
        /// Unable to cast object of type 'TestCustomTypesCast.CustomType' to type 'TestCustomTypesCast.SubCustomType'.
        return (T)this.Rtf;
    }
}

public class SubCustomRichTextBox : CustomRichTextBox<SubCustomType>
{
}

When I use SubCustomRichTextBox (an instance of the generic class that has as type argument the SUB custom type), I get an InvalidCastException at the line where I cast to T in GetValue. What I think is going on is that in order for the compiler to be okay with the fact that I am using T to cast from string, it is looking at CustomType and seeing its cast overload. But even when I use a subclass of CustomType as the actual type argument, the compiler still looks to SubCustomType.CustomType(string s) to perform the cast, and not at the correct SubCustomType.SubCustomType(string s) method.

Can anyone point me in the direction of fixing this problem? I want to use the generic class because it would allow me to reuse the same code. If I can't use generics, then I'll need to duplicate code in several subclasses of CustomRichTextBox<T>. Thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's going to be hard because the operator overload is static, and you're essentially trying to get a virtual behaviour.

Try this:

public class CustomRichTextBox<T> : Forms.RichTextBox
    where T : CustomType, new()
{
    public object GetValue()
    {
        T t = new T();
        t.InnerString = this.Rtf;
        return t;
    }
}

Note I've added new() to the type constraint. I also had to make InnerString public settable.

As an aside, you coule make the return type of GetValue() be T. That might be a nicer API.

share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping to represent my custom types as values as much as possible (i.e., immutable.) So what I will do is to create a .SetInnerString method to make it more explicit when a user calls it. I'm trying to figure out if there is some use of the dynamic type that could solve this (and whether such a solution would even be preferable!) With regards to return type of T vs. object I agree. This was just a hold-over from the fact that this method is actually IDataGridViewEditingControl.GetEditingControlFormattedValue in my project. Thanks for your advice. –  Carl G May 17 '12 at 22:23
1  
For immutability, you might want to have .SetInnerString throw an exception if the previous value is null (or at least fail an assertion). –  pamphlet May 17 '12 at 22:50
    
That's a great idea. In that case I can call it .InitializeInnerString. Thanks. –  Carl G May 18 '12 at 4:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.