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I've been attempting to use this article (http://haacked.com/archive/2011/10/10/preventing-csrf-with-ajax.aspx) to protect against a csrf attack for an ajax/jquery post of json data. It however fails the validation. In my view, I render the token using

@Html.AntiForgeryToken()

Then in my script I get it using

var token = $('input[name=""__RequestVerificationToken""]').val();

Then do the following to submit my ajax request

           //Do data request. Insert your own API logic here.
            var headers = {};
            // other headers omitted
            headers['__RequestVerificationToken'] = token;

            $.ajax({
              cache: false,
              dataType: 'json',
              type: 'POST',
              headers: headers,
              data: {
                  searchName: $(this).val()
            },
              contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
              url: 'MyAction',
              success:  function (data) {
                 alert('dsf');
             },
             error: function (jqHXR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
                alert(textStatus);
                alert(errorThrown);
            }
            });

And on the server side have the following

[HttpPost]
 [ValidateJsonAntiForgeryToken]
public ActionResult MyAction(string searchName)
 {
     // some code
 }

And the attribute is defined (using what is in the article) as:

        [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
        public class ValidateJsonAntiForgeryTokenAttribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
      {

public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
{
    if (filterContext == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");
    }

    var httpContext = new JsonAntiForgeryHttpContextWrapper(HttpContext.Current);
    AntiForgery.Validate(httpContext, Salt ?? string.Empty);
}

public string Salt
{
    get;
    set;
}

private class JsonAntiForgeryHttpContextWrapper : HttpContextWrapper
{
    readonly HttpRequestBase _request;
    public JsonAntiForgeryHttpContextWrapper(HttpContext httpContext)
        : base(httpContext)
    {
        _request = new JsonAntiForgeryHttpRequestWrapper(httpContext.Request);
    }

    public override HttpRequestBase Request
    {
        get
        {
            return _request;
        }
    }
}

private class JsonAntiForgeryHttpRequestWrapper : HttpRequestWrapper
{
    readonly NameValueCollection _form;

    public JsonAntiForgeryHttpRequestWrapper(HttpRequest request)
        : base(request)
    {
        _form = new NameValueCollection(request.Form);
        if (request.Headers["__RequestVerificationToken"] != null)
        {
            _form["__RequestVerificationToken"] = request.Headers["__RequestVerificationToken"];
        }
    }

    public override NameValueCollection Form
    {
        get
        {
            return _form;
        }
    }
}
}

But it fails during the validation of the token (at the AntiForgery.Validate call in the attribute, even though the token is in the form collection and named correctly). I noticed that the problem may be that I am creating an antiforgerytoken in my layout for one form and I am creating an antiforgerytoken in my view for another form and they are both different values. The ajax post is supposed to be using this one, but I suspect it's sending the other antiforgerytoken. I thought that for every request that all antiforgerytokens on the same page should be rendered with the same value? Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Edit: Here's an even simpler example of it not working (this is mvc 4 beta too, and this is a public viewable page/action, not sure if that matters)...the view:

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "TestView";
}

<div class="row">
    <div class="span4">
        @using (Html.BeginForm("TestView", "Home"))
        {
                <input type="text" value="value" name="ValiueText" />
                    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
                <input type="submit" value="click" />
        }
        <a class="btn" id="aClick">Ajax Click</a>
        </div>
</div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function () {
        var token = $('input[name=""__RequestVerificationToken""]').val();
        var headers = {};
        // other headers omitted
        headers['__RequestVerificationToken'] = token;

        $('#aClick').on("click", function (event) {
            alert('here');
            $.ajax({
                cache: false,
                dataType: 'json',
                type: 'POST',
                headers: headers,
                data: { textString: "soemvalue" },
                contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
                url: '/TestView/'
            });
        });
    });
</script>

And controller actions:

    public ActionResult TestView()
    {
        return View();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    [ValidateJsonAntiForgeryToken]
    public ActionResult TestView(string textString)
    {
        return View();
    }

So, looking at this example, it works just fine doing a regular post to this action with the submit button, but when you click the ajax button that calls the jquery ajax post, it fails inside the ValidateJsonAntiForgeryToken when it calls this line:

AntiForgery.Validate(httpContext, Salt ?? string.Empty);

Is there any better alternative maybe to making this work? I'm about ready to give up on posting json and only serialize the form from now on and have jquery post it that way. The only problem is, I'd like to eventually use a client side library like knockoutjs and with that I'd have to post json, and I need to be able to protect against a csrf attack. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Could this maybe just be something changed and is broken in mvc 4 beta? –  user1368182 May 18 '12 at 2:46
    
I believe this is what is happening - exception on trying to deserialize the token: Validation of viewstate MAC failed. If this application is hosted by a Web Farm or cluster, ensure that <machineKey> configuration specifies the same validationKey and validation algorithm. AutoGenerate cannot be used in a cluster. –  user1368182 May 18 '12 at 13:40
    
It's actually when it tries to deserialize the request verification cookie, not the token in the form/header collection itself, so it is unable to deserialize the cookie in a json post, but it can in the regular post. I do have a valid machine key set up as evidenced by it working with a regular form post, but for some reason the cookie cannot be deserialized from a json post. Any help would be appreciated, thanks. –  user1368182 May 18 '12 at 15:03
    
Well, turns out it really wasn't even the token, but badly formatted json...maybe I should have been checking my error logs. :/ –  user1368182 May 18 '12 at 20:05
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