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I need your professional help in fixing this regex code using perl?

I have this data file...

__Data__
SCSI - test-A
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

__Data__
SCSI - test-B
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

__Data__
SCSI - test-C
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

I would like the following output

__Data__
SCSI - test-A

__Data__
SCSI - test-B

__Data__
SCSI - test-C

Instead, I'm getting this output which is missing the __Data__ for two of the data records.

__Data__
SCSI - test-A
SCSI - test-B
SCSI - test-C

Here the code..

$/ = "__Data__"; # setting the input separator variable to __Data__

while(<ReadFile>)
{
   $_ =~ s/(SCSI.*test-(A|B|C)?)(.*)/$1/ms;
   print $_;
}
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4 Answers

You're telling that Perl that lines end with __DATA__, so you're getting

1: "__Data__"
2: "\nSCSI - test-A\nccc\naaa\nbbb\n\n__Data__"
3: "\nSCSI - test-B\nccc\naaa\nbbb\n\n__Data__"
4: "\nSCSI - test-C\nccc\naaa\nbbb\n"

But you're incorrectly thinking you get

1: "__Data__\nSCSI - test-A\nccc\naaa\nbbb\n\n"
2: "__Data__\nSCSI - test-B\nccc\naaa\nbbb\n\n"
3: "__Data__\nSCSI - test-C\nccc\naaa\nbbb\n"

Solution:

my $after_data = 0;
while (<>) {
   if (/^__Data__$/) {
      print;
      $after_data = 1;
   }
   elsif ($after_data) {
      print;
      print "\n";
      $after_data = 0;
   }
}

You could also use paragraph mode:

local $/ = '';
while (<>) {
   print /^(.*\n.*\n)/;
   print "\n";
}
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thanks for the helpful technical explanation –  Joseph Walker May 17 '12 at 22:50
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Try adding

    $\ = $/;

… to set your output record separator, as well.

However, you'll end up with a final, spurious instance of __Data__ in that way, since it's printed after each record (at the end of each print).

Alternatively, you could split the input yourself:

  while (<ReadFile>)
  {   chomp;
      next unless $_ eq '__Data__'; print;
      my $next = <ReadFile>;
      $next =~ s/(SCSI.*text-(A|B|C)?).*/$1/ms;
      print $next;
  }
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thanks BRPocock, your frist suggestion works fine but an extra Data is shown. –  Joseph Walker May 17 '12 at 22:18
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Set the input record separator to an empty string to enable the paragraph mode. Add newlines to the print.

$/ = ""; # paragraph mode

while (<ReadFile>) {
    $_ =~ s/(SCSI.*test-(A|B|C))(.*)/$1/s;
    print "$_\n\n";
}
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Your solution works but I'm reading in lots of data records starting with Data . Does your solution requires blink space between each records? –  Joseph Walker May 17 '12 at 22:33
    
@JosephWalker: Yes, it does. The problem is your records /start/ with Data, but the input record separator is what /ends/ a record. –  choroba May 17 '12 at 23:16
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You seem to want to print lines that fit one of three categories.

  1. __Data__ markers
  2. SCSI test lines
  3. blank lines

Perl’s paragraph mode is handy when it works, but it’s brittle. Paragraphs are terminated by exactly the sequence "\n\n", but editors that don’t show whitespace can make this tricky to debug when you have a blank but non-empty line after a paragraph.

As written in your question, the code below produces the output you want.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.10.0;  # smart matching

*ARGV = *DATA;  # for demo only

my @interesting_line = (qr/^__Data__/, qr/SCSI - test-/, qr/^\s*$/);

while (<>) {
  print if $_ ~~ @interesting_line;
  print "\n" if eof && !eof();
}

__DATA__
__Data__
SCSI - test-A
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

__Data__
SCSI - test-B
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

__Data__
SCSI - test-C
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

In real use, you would remove the line marked for demo only and then provide one or more data files on the command line. The funny-looking if eof && !eof() test tries to determine when to insert extra separators between records. If you want it exactly right, you’ll need to be more deliberate about it.

An example of inputs over multiple files is below.

$ cat input1
__Data__
SCSI - test-A
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

__Data__
SCSI - test-B
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

$ cat input2
__Data__
SCSI - test-C
ccccccccccccccccc
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb

$ ./extract-tests input1 input2
__Data__
SCSI - test-A

__Data__
SCSI - test-B

__Data__
SCSI - test-C
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