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I've got this code:

Entry.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Entry : NSObject {
    id object;
    SEL function;
}

@property (retain) id object;
@property (assign) SEL function;

-(Entry*) initWithObject:(id)object selector:(SEL)function;

@end

Entry.m

#import "Entry.h"

@implementation Entry

@synthesize object;
@synthesize function;

-(Entry*) initWithObject:(id)obj selector:(SEL)sel {
    self = [super init];
    [self setObject:obj];
    [self setFunction:sel];
    return self;
}

-(void) dealloc {
    [super dealloc];
    if ([self object] != nil)
        [[self object] release];
}

@end

And when I do this:

Entry *hej = [Entry alloc];
[hej release];

I get:

objc[2504]: FREED(id): message object sent to freed object=0xf5ecd0
Program received signal:  “EXC_BAD_INSTRUCTION”.

What am I doing wrong?

(And this insert code thing at stack overflow doesnt work, unless I'm doing something wrong and you're not supposed to click "code sample" and then paste.)

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1  
You haven't inited the object hej. –  mkb Jun 30 '09 at 15:58
    
the 'code thing' works well if you first paste the code into the edit field, then select the code you want to mark as code, then click the 'code' button... (confused me for awhile too) –  kent Jun 30 '09 at 16:05
    
The (`) delimiters are used for inline monospace font. Code samples should all be indented with 4 spaces at the start of each line, per the rules of Markdown. I fixed the formatting of your code samples so it wasn't one huge scrolling block. –  Quinn Taylor Jul 2 '09 at 5:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

+alloc only allocates memory. You need -init to actually create the object in that memory space. Since you are only allocating memory and not creating an object there, calling -release on a chunk of memory is giving you an error. Further, you want your [super dealloc] call to appear at the end of you -dealloc method. Change those two things and the following should work:

Entry *hej = [[Entry alloc] init];
[hej release];
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1  
The last potential problem (which you'll rarely see in practice, but coding for it is "the right thing") is checking self for nil, as @Kent points out. Use this around your code: if ((self = [super init]) != nil) { ... } –  Quinn Taylor Jul 2 '09 at 5:41

there are two problems here:

1) you need to check that self = [super init] does not return nil. Typical usage would be to follow wrap your initialization code with the conditional:

if ((self = [super init]) != nil) {
    // initialize the object...
}

2) but where you are getting stuck is on instantiating your object: you should do it like this:

Entry *hej = [[Entry alloc] initWithObject:myObj selector:mySelector];

(assuming that you want to go through the custom initializer you just defined... else just use the default init method.) but 'alloc' must be followed by an init.

Entry *hej = [[Entry alloc] init]; // will do the trick...
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1  
chuck is also correct in pointing out that your dealloc method should call [super dealloc] as the very last thing before exiting... (so three problems in toto) –  kent Jun 30 '09 at 16:14

Firstly, you need an init to go with your alloc. Second, in dealloc, you send a message to self after calling [super dealloc]. You can't do that. The final deallocation should go at the end.

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what exactly does dealloc do? Why does it care if the object is initialized or not? Why not just free the memory that was allocated? –  quano Jul 1 '09 at 13:35
    
It does free the memory. Dealloc destroys the object and frees the memory used to hold it. Thus you can't send the object any more messages since it no longer exists. –  Chuck Jul 1 '09 at 14:42
    
Where can I find the source of the original dealloc? I wanna see what it does. –  quano Jul 1 '09 at 15:49
    
Cocoa isn't open source, so you can't see Apple's implementation. You can read Apple's docs to find out what it does. If you want to see an example implementation, you could check out GNUstep Base. –  Chuck Jul 1 '09 at 17:14

I would also recommend changing:

if ([self object] != nil)
    [[self object] release];

to:

[self setObject:nil];

It's less code and functionally equivalent. =)

share|improve this answer
    
But won't the object still exist if you do so? –  quano Jun 30 '09 at 18:13
2  
@quano: No, because it's going through your synthesized accessor. Since the property is declared retain, the accessor will release the old value when you set a new one. It's just the same as any time you call [self setObject:something], you don't need to explicitly release the old value. –  Chuck Jul 1 '09 at 2:27
    
that makes sense. I also saw that you can just do [[self object] release], because it is okay to send messages to nil objects. –  quano Jul 1 '09 at 13:45
1  
Mmm, that's not a good idea. Apple strongly discourages using properties in init and dealloc methods. Manually releasing in dealloc is almost always the right thing to do. In this case you can just do [object release] — if object is nil, the message is ignored anyway, and no harm done. –  Quinn Taylor Jul 2 '09 at 5:43
    
@Quinn - I call bull. With the iPhone SDK, you can define @properties without declaring a corresponding ivar. The compiler will notice this and add the ivar for you. However, you don't necessarily know what that ivar is called, and more importantly, it doesn't exist when you're typing code. This means the only way to release the object (if it's declared as retain or copy) is by setting it to nil. And the place to do that is in the dealloc method. –  Dave DeLong Jul 2 '09 at 16:14

There are many things wrong with your code. I'll try to go through them.

First, its better to use a different ivar name to your property name so its clear where you are using each. Apple normally uses an underscore prefix, but any prefix will do.

@interface Entry : NSObject {
    id _object;
    SEL _function;
}

@property (retain) id object;
@property (assign) SEL function;

@synthesize object = _object;
@synthesize function = _function;

Next, you aren't using the standard init template (although this probably wont make any difference normally).

-(Entry*) initWithObject:(id)obj selector:(SEL)sel {
    self = [super init];
if (self != nil) {
    // initializations
}
    return self;
}

Next, Apple (for good reasons) recommends against using getters/setters in your init/dealloc. So your init would be:

-(Entry*) initWithObject:(id)obj selector:(SEL)sel {
    self = [super init];
if (self != nil) {
    _object = [obj retain];
    _object = sel;
}
    return self;
}

Next, after [super dealloc] your object is destroyed, so you cannot reference self (and hence your ivars) after that, so your dealloc should look like:

-(void) dealloc {
    // your deallocations
    [super dealloc];
}

Further, as above, Apple recommends you should not use setters or getters in your dealloc routine, so your deallocation would initially look like:

if (_object != nil)
    [_object release];

But further still, Objective C allows (and Cocoa encourages) that sending a method to nil does nothing. This is in stark contast to most other languages where messaging nil would cause a crash, but it is how Objective C/Cocoa work and you need to get used to it. So your deallocation is actually just:

[_object release];

And finally, alloc only allocates the memory for your object, you have to initialize it, so the initialization would be something like:

Entry *hej = [[Entry alloc] initWithObject:myobj selector:@selector(mymethod)];
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks peter. :) –  quano Jul 2 '09 at 11:24

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