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class A
{
   private:
           int x;
   public:
           virtual void show()
           {
               cout<<"X: "<<x;
           }
};

class B: public A
{
    public:
           virtual void show()
           {
               cout<<"In class B\n";
               A::show();
           }
};

My question is about accessibility from a member function. In this example, can we say that member function of B (show() of B) can access X in the class A.

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3 Answers 3

Since x is declared private in A, nothing in B can directly access it. Of course, it can be accessed indirectly -- B can call A::show() which can access x. But B::show() cannot access x, nor can anything else in B.

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If I am not wrong, you meant that calling A::show() in B::show() is not considered accessing X by using a member function of class B. Am I wright? –  user1078163 May 18 '12 at 0:34
    
Correct. It is not, because nothing defined in B writes a value to x or reads a value from x (nor can it). –  QuantumMechanic May 18 '12 at 0:51

You are not really accessing A.x, you are accessing A.show().

To answer your question, B::show() is not accessing the private member x in A.

The reason for this is, class A can change the function A::show() and do something else, and B can just call A::show().

This is the main point of encapsulation. You can tell A to do things (like show()), but A decides how to do them.

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  1. A::show() can access any member variables in it's own class, class A.
  2. Member functions in class B can access any public or protected member variables in class A.
    and
  3. Member functions in class B can access any public of protected member functions in class A.

2 and 3 are possible because the "Most accessible level" of A is defined as public.

Class B: public A

In your code, specifically, the accessibility level of int x; doesn't matter, because it is never directly accessed from class B.

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