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I have been told the following is insecure:

cursor.execute("""SELECT currency FROM exchange_rates WHERE date='%s'"""%(self.date))

Why exactly is the '%s' bad? How would someone actually do a SQL injection here?

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1  
It's not necessarily possible to do a SQL injection here. Depends what self.date can contain. But it's good idea to just pass the parameters to the query properly - it's not like it takes any extra effort to do so. –  gnibbler May 18 '12 at 5:02
    
-1 seriously, put how does sql injection work into Google and you get several similar examples. –  Karl Knechtel May 18 '12 at 5:06
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Imagine if self.date is "'; DROP TABLE exchange_rates --". Then you'll execute:

SELECT currency FROM exchange_rates WHERE date=''; DROP TABLE exchange_rates -- '

and boom, you're hosed. You have to escape the ' so the value of self.date will be completely contained in the string, not executed as a query.

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-1 because it is not best practice to attempt to escape special characters; you should instead leverage the python DBAPI's ability to pass values separately from the query. –  Andrew Gorcester May 18 '12 at 1:11
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The downvote is a bit of 'baby out with the bathwater' solely on the poor remedy. The OP is asking for "HOW". –  p.campbell May 18 '12 at 1:13
    
Originally I had a comment disagreeing here, but I changed my mind (unfortunately too late to revert the downvote). –  Andrew Gorcester May 18 '12 at 1:29
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The problem is that you're using string formatting when you should be passing values separately from the query.

For instance, compare:

cursor.execute("SELECT currency FROM exchange_rates WHERE date=?", self.date)

With the string formatting method, someone can put a ; into the value (edit: specifically, close the quote with a ' and then add the semicolon) and then try to inject an additional query after that, and it will be executed just like that. By passing the value separately, you ensure that data is treated only as data and is not executed as a query.

An added benefit in this case is that if self.date is a python date or datetime object, that will be automatically formatted in the appropriate fashion for your database when it is sent. If you try to add self.date to the query string directly, you'll have to use date formatting to ensure it's output exactly as the database expects it to be.

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