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I'm learning about Factory Girl and I saw this code:

factory :post do
  association :author, factory: :user, last_name: "Writely"
end

why do factory and last_name have a colon at their end?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The colon in this context denotes a literal Hash.

factory is the Hash key, :user is the value.

The alternative syntax is :factory => :user. They mean the same thing.

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10  
Note that the non-hashrocket syntax was added in Ruby 1.9, and doesn't exist in earlier versions. –  Andrew Marshall May 18 '12 at 1:47
1  
@Arman Not exactly, using the : always makes the key a literal symbol, which doesn't happen with the =>. If you want to use anything other than a literal symbol (variable, string, etc.) as the key you have to use the =>. –  Andrew Marshall May 18 '12 at 2:49
3  
@Arman Yup, as in the answers here: :foo => "bar", foo: "bar", and "foo": "bar" are equivalent, and different from "foo" => "bar and foo => "bar". –  Andrew Marshall May 18 '12 at 4:53
1  
@AndrewMarshall: pastie.org/3928932 –  Sergio Tulentsev May 18 '12 at 5:15
5  
ruby has too many ways to type every statement –  Tom Andersen Nov 21 '13 at 19:54

Ruby 1.8 syntax:

:factory => :user

Ruby 1.9 syntax:

factory: :user

Note that the Ruby 1.8 syntax works in 1.9 also.

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1  
What was the rationale behind adding this new syntax? I think it reads worse than the rockets/arrows, which are commonly understood to represent mappings. –  Matthias Nov 20 '13 at 16:08
2  
I'm uncertain why it was changed. I googled around and can't find any obvious discussion on it. If you find some background pls post it, i'm interested. Thanks1 –  Kevin Bedell Nov 20 '13 at 16:41
    
This change may have something to do with how Javascript and perhaps other languages handle object literal notation. For example, in JavaScript, we can do: var person = { name: "John", age: 42, married: false } so really, when we're passing factory: :user, what we're really doing is passing {factory: :user}, also written as {:factory => :user}. The 1.9 syntax is intended to make it easier to do something like {factory: "user"} –  monarch Jun 20 '14 at 15:52

The other answers are right. There was some speculation regarding the rationale behind this new syntax. This change may have something to do with how Javascript and perhaps other languages handle object literal notation. A need was felt, perhaps, to bring ruby more in-line with how these languages handle object creation.

For example, in JavaScript, we can do:

var person = {
    name: "John",
    age: 42,
    married: false
}

So really, when we're passing factory: :user, what we're really doing is passing {factory: :user}, also written as {:factory => :user}. The 1.9 syntax is intended to make it easier to do something like {factory: "user"}

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I feel this is a much better way to specify a hash (I might be biased since come from python dicts though). Even from the perspective of POLA and programmer-happiness that ruby and RoR so enthusiastically endorse, the typing-heavy hashrocket was a sore thumb in my opinion. Good that we have an option of using colon notation now. –  Shreyas Mar 22 at 4:58

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