Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This came up when I was looking into a bug in the boost::fusion::fused function wrapper when using decltype. The issue seems to be that an invalid decltype is a compile error, even if the template instantiation that requires it will not be used, and I cannot figure out how to get around that to create a generic function wrapper.

Here's my attempt at the single-argument wrapper:

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>

template <class T>
typename std::add_rvalue_reference<T>::type declval();

template <class Fn, class Arg>
struct get_return_type
{
    typedef decltype(declval<Fn>()(declval<Arg>())) type;
};

template <class Fn>
struct wrapper
{
    explicit wrapper(Fn fn) : fn(fn) {}
    Fn fn;

    template <class Arg>
    typename get_return_type<Fn,Arg&&>::type
        operator()(Arg&& arg)
    {
        return fn(std::forward<Arg>(arg));
    }

    template <class Arg>
    typename get_return_type<const Fn,Arg&&>::type
        operator()(Arg&& arg)
    {
        return fn(std::forward<Arg>(arg));
    }
};

The trouble is, this doesn't work for cases where the arguments to the non-const version are not convertible to the arguments for the const version. For example:

#include <iostream>

struct x {};
struct y {};

struct foo
{
    void operator()(x) { std::cout << "void operator()(x)" << std::endl; }
    void operator()(y) const { std::cout << "void operator()(y) const" << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    wrapper<foo> b = wrapper<foo>(foo());
    b(x()); // fail
}

It seems to me that the failure of the decltype expression caused by void operator()(y) const should simply result in that function being removed due to SFINAE.

share|improve this question
    
shouldn't there be a return in your operators for the wrapper? –  BЈовић May 18 '12 at 4:43
    
@VJovic Whoops! Thanks, I've added them now. –  Ayjay May 18 '12 at 4:53
    
Also the 2nd operator() in the wrapper should be const. What compiler? What is the error? For g++ 4.6.1 I get some weird error : no match for call to (const foo)(x) –  BЈовић May 18 '12 at 5:11
    
I've tried this with g++ 4.7 and VS2010. Both fail the same way - the template instantiation get_return_type<const Fn,Arg&&>::type fails and, instead of being removed due to SFINAE, it causes a compilation error. –  Ayjay May 18 '12 at 5:22

1 Answer 1

Here is the code that compiles fine on g++ 4.6.1 :

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template <class Fn, class Arg>
struct get_return_type
{
    typedef decltype( std::declval<Fn>() ( std::declval<Arg>() ) ) type;
};

template <class Fn>
struct wrapper
{
    explicit wrapper(Fn fn) : fn(fn) {}
    Fn fn;

    template <class Arg>
    typename get_return_type<Fn,Arg&&>::type
    operator()(Arg&& arg)
    {
        return fn(std::forward<Arg>(arg));
    }

    template <class Arg>
    typename get_return_type< const Fn,Arg&&>::type
    operator()(Arg&& arg) const
    {
        return fn(std::forward<Arg>(arg));
    }
};

struct x {};
struct y {};

struct foo
{
    x* operator()(x) { std::cout << "x* operator()(x)" << std::endl; return nullptr; }
    x operator()(x) const { std::cout << "x operator()(x) const" << std::endl; return x(); }
    y* operator()(y) { std::cout << "y* operator()(y)" << std::endl; return nullptr; }
    y operator()(y) const { std::cout << "y operator()(y) const" << std::endl; return y(); }
};

template <class Fn>
void test_foo(Fn fn)
{
    // make sure all operator() overloads are callable
    const Fn& cfn = fn;

    x* a = fn(x());
    x b = cfn(x());
    y* c = fn(y());
    y d = cfn(y());
(void)a;(void)b;(void)c;(void)d;
}

int main()
{
    test_foo(foo());
    test_foo(wrapper<foo>(foo())); // fail
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, if you change the functor, then sure, but the point is can a function wrapper be written that can wrap every function? –  Ayjay May 18 '12 at 5:20
    
@Ayjay The above code is fixed version that compiles fine for both x and y :) –  BЈовић May 18 '12 at 5:48
    
But now it doesn't correctly determine the return type of a const functor. –  Ayjay May 21 '12 at 3:46
    
@Ayjay what is expected? what you got? –  BЈовић May 21 '12 at 5:56
    
@BЈовић I want the wrapper class to be able to wrap any function object that contains an arbitrary amount of operator() overloads. As long as a valid overload is called by the callee, it should work. –  Ayjay May 21 '12 at 8:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.