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In the following code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my %hash = %Whatever::whatever;
my @array = @Whatever::whatever;
print Dumper \@array;
print Dumper \%hash;

My understanding is that @Whatever::whatever is accessing the symbol table, and doesn't produce an error message because symbol table is a hash. But why there isn't at least a warning message for accessing a non-existing element?

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Interesting: my @array = @Whatever; does generate an error, of course. –  Jonathan Leffler May 18 '12 at 4:27
2  
I would say instead that @Whatever::whatever identifies a dynamically scoped array named @whatever in the Whatever package, rather than that is it "accessing the symbol table ... [somewhat as] a hash." Qualified identifiers like that have always avoided strictures. –  pilcrow May 18 '12 at 13:22
    
@pilcrow thanks. could you please put this as an answer? –  Nylon Smile May 21 '12 at 4:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(adapting/migrating from a comment)

I would say instead that @Whatever::whatever identifies a dynamically scoped array named @whatever in the Whatever package, rather than that is it "accessing the symbol table ... [somewhat as] a hash."

Qualified identifiers like that have always avoided strictures (see the docs for strict 'vars').

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Because it's almost impossible to catch a global variable in a state of non-existence in Perl. As soon as you mention one by name — even just to take a reference to it — it exists. And because arrays and hashes are different from scalars; a scalar comes into existence holding the value undef, which triggers a "use of uninitialized value" warning when used for most purposes; but arrays and hashes come into existence as empty arrays and hashes, and an empty array or hash isn't exceptional enough to warn about!

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It's only impossible if you construe the problem too narrowly because strict does a good job of solving that problem. The catch is that an exception was specifically carved out of strict for fully-qualified names. One just needs to be a bit more careful using those. –  ikegami May 18 '12 at 17:18

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