Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Example input:

[('b', 'c', 4),
('l', 'r', 5),
('i', 'a', 6),
('c', 't', 7),
('a', '$', 8),
('n', '$', 9)]

[0] contains the vertical heading, [1] contains the horizontal heading.

Example output:

  c r a t $ $
b 4  
l   5
i     6
c       7
a         8
n           9

Note: given enough tuples the entire table could be filled :P

How do I format output as a table in Python using [preferably] one line of code?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "format as table"? Can you provide an example of the kind of formatting you'd like? –  Li-aung Yip May 18 '12 at 4:28
    
I've included the example output in the tabular output I am looking for. –  A T May 18 '12 at 4:29
1  
It is not clear from the example exactly what you are looking for. What do the dots represent? What pattern is followed in the table? –  Josiah May 18 '12 at 4:38
    
Header row, left column row. Add the number together to the corresponding one (by cell position). Show the results in a table structured like above. –  A T May 18 '12 at 4:50
1  
Your example input doesn't compile for me (Python 2.7) - you're missing at least a colon from the end of your def, amongst other errors. –  Li-aung Yip May 18 '12 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's an answer for your revised question:

data = [
    ['A','a','1'],
    ['B','b','2'],
    ['C','c','3'],
    ['D','d','4']
]

# Desired output:
#
#   A B C D
# a 1
# b   2
# c     3
# d       4

# Check data consists of colname, rowname, value triples
assert all([3 == len(row) for row in data])
# Convert all data to strings
data = [ [str(c) for c in r] for r in data]
# Check all data is one character wide
assert all([1 == len(s) for s in r for r in data])

#============================================================================
# Verbose version
#============================================================================
col_names, row_names, values = zip(*data) # Transpose

header_line = '  ' + ' '.join(col_names)
row_lines = []
for idx, (row_name, value) in enumerate(zip(row_names,values)):
    # Use '  '*n to get 2n consecutive spaces.
    row_line = row_name + ' ' + '  '*idx + value
    row_lines.append(row_line)

print header_line
for r in row_lines:
    print (r)

Or, if that's too long for you, try this:

cs, rs, vs = zip(*data)
print ('\n'.join(['  '+' '.join(cs)] + [r+' '+'  '*i+v for i,(r,v) in enumerate(zip(rs,vs))]))

Both have the following output:

  A B C D
a 1
b   2
c     3
d       4

Here's the kernel of what you want (no reader row or header column)

>>> print('\n'.join([ ''.join([str(i+j+2).rjust(3)
    for i in range(10)]) for j in range(10) ]))

  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11
  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12
  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13
  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14
  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

It uses a nested list comprehension over i and j to generate the numbers i+j, then str.rjust() to pad all fields to three characters in length, and finally some str.join()s to put all the substrings together.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks...: +1 –  A T May 20 '12 at 13:58

Assuming python 2.x, it's a bit ugly, but it's functional:

import operator
from functools import partial
x = range(1,11)
y = range(0,11)
multtable = [y]+[[i]+map(partial(operator.add,i),y[1:]) for i in x]
for i in multtable:
    for j in i:
        print str(j).rjust(3),
    print

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11
  2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12
  3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13
  4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14
  5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
  6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16
  7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17
  8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18
  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19
 10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20

Your problem is so darn specific, it's difficult to make a real generic example.

The important part here, though, is the part that makes the table, rathter than the actual printing:

[map(partial(operator.add,i),y[1:]) for i in x]
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, forgot to mention that I am needing it for strings as well. Numbers as the results, e.g. comparing gödel numbering of characters. Would this still work for that? –  A T May 18 '12 at 5:22
    
I believe (str(j)+"".join([' ' for _ in range(2-len(str(j)))])) can also be said str.ljust(3). –  Li-aung Yip May 18 '12 at 5:25
    
Indeed it can, I was just in the process of changing it to rjust, which I wasn't actually aware of, so thank you for teaching me that. –  Josiah May 18 '12 at 5:26
    
@AT: I believe we've both read your question as "how do I format the specific input shown as a table?" If you want to ask a general question, you need to indicate that a general solution is required. –  Li-aung Yip May 18 '12 at 5:26
    
@A T It will work on any data type operator.add will have the desired effect on. So no, probably not on strings. –  Josiah May 18 '12 at 5:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.