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I know that there is a way to make a for loop work like a while loop.

I have this code working :

while (BR.BaseStream.Position < BR.BaseStream.Length) // BR = BinaryReader
{
    int BlockLength = BR.ReadInt32();
    byte[] Content = BR.ReadBytes(BlockLength);
}

I need the for equivalent for this while loop..

So Far, I have this :

for (long Position = BR.BaseStream.Position; Position < BR.BaseStream.Length; //Don't Know This)
{
    int BlockLength = BR.ReadInt32();
    byte[] Content = BR.ReadBytes(BlockLength);
}
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Why would you want to do that? why not use the while look itself? –  Ramesh May 18 '12 at 6:43
    
Smells like homework. –  dwerner May 18 '12 at 6:43
    
@dwerner Not a homework as this is my recent project! Actually i want to transfer all the while loops to for loops –  Writwick May 18 '12 at 6:45
    
there's no real purpose, IMO the while loops are more readable than the for loops. –  Robert Rouhani May 18 '12 at 6:47
    
@I.am.WritZ as Robert mentioned, there is no real reason, why you should be doing that. –  Ramesh May 18 '12 at 6:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Every time you use one of the Read methods, the BinaryReader increments it's position, so you don't actually need anything in that section.

for (long Position = BR.BaseStream.Position; Position < BR.BaseStream.Length; Position = BR.BaseStream.Position)
{
    int BlockLength = BR.ReadInt32();
    byte[] Content = BR.ReadBytes(BlockLength);
}

Update: I just realized that the Position variable isn't ever getting updated. You could either update it at the end of the for loop or in the third section. I updated the code to update Position in the third section of the for loop.

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Thanks I was just looking for this!! –  Writwick May 18 '12 at 6:50
    
This is the answer in 5 mins! –  Writwick May 18 '12 at 6:51

I am not sure why you want to do it, but this is how your for loop should look like

int i = 0;
for (; true; )
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
    if(++i==10)
        break;
}
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C# inherits the null statement expression... –  dwerner May 18 '12 at 6:46
    
Good Answer! +1 –  Writwick May 18 '12 at 6:50

In pseudocode, these two loops are equivalent:

Loop 1:

Type t = initialiser;
while (t.MeetsCondition())
{
  // Do whatever
  t.GetNextValue();
}

Loop 2:

for (Type t = initialiser; t.MeetsCondition(); t.GetNextValue())
  // Do whatever

I think you can work out the rest from here.

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for (long Position = BR.BaseStream.Position; Position < BR.BaseStream.Length; /* If you Don't Know     This, dont specify this. It is Optionl and can be kept blank */)
{
  int BlockLength = BR.ReadInt32();
  byte[] Content = BR.ReadBytes(BlockLength);
}
share|improve this answer

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