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I am trying read stdout of my own program into 2 arrays like this

#include<stdio.h>

int main ()
{
    char arr[100]={0};
    char arr2[100]={0};

    printf("Hello world\n"); // This writes to stdout

    fgets( arr, 80, stdout );

    fseek ( stdout, 0, SEEK_SET );

    fgets ( arr2, 80, stdout );
    printf ("First array is %s\n", arr );
    printf ("Second array is %s\n", arr2 );

    return 0;

}

The output is not what I expect. That is both the arrays are empty instead of containing Hello World as I expected.

I went through this post which suggests dealing with pipes to accomplish what I want but doesn't tell me why my above code doesn't work?

EDIT: Though it would be nice to know alternatives to make the above work as it should, I am more curious on the problems involved in reading stdout of the same program

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To suggest alternative, you need to tell us what do you need this for and why. Are you trying to simulate /usr/bin/tee? – hamstergene May 18 '12 at 7:16
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not every file is seekable, readable or writeable. Stdout is usually a kind that can't be read back.

Most likely, stdout will be a pipe. In that case, your program holds the writable end, and someone else holds the readable end. The pipe implementation just transfers data and does not keep it; once it has been read at the other end, there is no way to get it back.

If you want a file that can be read back, create a regular temporary file, or your own pipe, and use fprintf/fscanf instead of printf/scanf. Alternatively, do freopen on stdout to reassign it to another file/pipe, then printf will operate on that new file.

share|improve this answer
    
I cant completely agree with you on your first assertion. If stdout cant be read back then how does the shell show up the output of other programs? The problem seems to arise when we read stdout of the same program. Also, I am aware of the alternatives, but I wanted to know why this particular method doesn't work. – Pavan Manjunath May 18 '12 at 7:01
    
@Stacker stdout is usually a pipe. The shell holds the end that can only be read from, and your program holds the end that can only be written to. stdin is set up exactly the opposite way. – hamstergene May 18 '12 at 7:03
    
@Stacker In fact, shell does not even read output of programs. It connects terminal to their stdout (or to a file, if you use >redirection, or to stdin of another program if you use | piping) and whatever is printed goes directly to that terminal device, file or program. Shell may have already exited by that time. – hamstergene May 18 '12 at 7:11
    
Thanks a lot for the clarifications @hamstergene. I dint know stdout acted as a pipe. I always thought it was a file and if so why couldn't we read it from the same program. I'll try reading more about it. Thanks! – Pavan Manjunath May 18 '12 at 7:23

This is the correct code:

#include<stdio.h>

int main ()
{
char arr[100]={0};
char arr2[100]={0};
int i,j;

printf("Hello world\n"); // This writes to stdout

fgets( arr, 80, stdin );

fgets ( arr2, 80, stdin );
printf("\n");
for(i=0; i<80; i++){
    printf ("%c", arr[i]);
}
for(j=0; j<80; j++){
    printf ("%c", arr2[j]);
}

return 0;
}

1) fgets has to read from stdin and not from stdout :)
2) you cannot print all the array with printf array, you must iterate into it with a for cicle

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Well, in this case he is reading strings, so he can use %s to write them also. What's wrong with that? – Shahbaz Jun 17 '12 at 15:15

I suggest you to use gotoxy, its a very simple command where you place coordinates of the position of the stdout.

COORD coord={0,0};
void gotoxy(int x,int y){
   coord.X=x;coord.Y=y;
   SetConsoleCursorPosition(GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE),coord);
}
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