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I have following Jsonstring

  var j = { "name": "John" };
            alert(j.length);

it alerts : undefined, How can i find the length of json Array object??

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
That isn't a "json Array object", it's a string literal that creates an object. –  RobG May 18 '12 at 7:12
    
isn't it considered a json object? –  true May 18 '12 at 7:12
    
@RPM—No. JSON is "JavaScript Object Notation" that is based on ECMAScript object literal notation. –  RobG May 18 '12 at 7:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Lets start with the json string:

var jsonString = '{"name":"John"}';

you can easily determine its length:

alert("The string has "+jsonString.length+" characters"); // will alert 15

Then parse it to an object:

var jsonObject = JSON.parse(jsonString);

A JavaScript Object is not an Array and has no length. If you want to know how many properties it has, you will need to count them:

var propertyNames = Object.keys(jsonObject);
alert("There are "+propertyNames.length+" properties in the object"); // will alert 1

If Object.keys, the function to get an Array with the (own) property names from an Object, is not available in your environment (older browsers etc.), you will need to count manually:

var props = 0;
for (var key in jsonObject) {
    // if (j.hasOwnProperty(k))
    /* is only needed when your object would inherit other enumerable
       properties from a prototype object */
        props++;
}
alert("Iterated over "+props+" properties"); // will alert 1
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, would you mind editing the question to make it clear what it's talking about? I bet you know the subject matter better than I do and would do a better job of it. Thanks! –  Anna Lear May 26 '12 at 3:40
    
What is it that you don't think beeing clear? –  Bergi May 28 '12 at 17:51
    
You mentioned something about JSON array vs normal JSON object in your flag? –  Anna Lear May 28 '12 at 17:53
    
JSON is just the serialisation. Yet, JS objects are more like maps/dictionaries, and Arrays are special objects with enumeration. So, the example object the OP asked about is not an Array. –  Bergi May 28 '12 at 18:01
function getObjectSize(o) {
  var c = 0;
  for (var k in o) 
    if (o.hasOwnProperty(k)) ++c;
  return c;
}  
var j = { "name": "John" };

alert(getObjectSize(j)); // 1
share|improve this answer

There is no json Array object in javascrit. j is just an object in javascript.

If you means the number of properties the object has(exclude the prototype's), you could count it by the below way:

  var length = 0;
  for (var k in j) {
    if (j.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
      length++;
    }
  }
  alert(length);
share|improve this answer

An alternate in Jquery:

 var myObject = {"jsonObj" : [    
        {
            "content" : [
                {"name" : "John"},
            ]
        }
        ]
       }
        $.each(myObject.jsonObj, function() {
           alert(this.content.length);
        }); 

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
okay but this involes jquery. He never mentioned jquery in his question –  true May 18 '12 at 7:18
    
@RPM oops! okay..let this be an alternate if the user prefers to use Jquery. –  Vimal May 18 '12 at 7:21
    
haha. no man its cool. As soon as I wrote my answer I had to check if I was using any jQuery functions. I'm so used to using jQuery. –  true May 18 '12 at 7:23

Another way of doing this is to use the later JSON.stringify method which will give you an object (a string) on which you can use the length property:

var x = JSON.stringify({ "name" : "John" });

alert(x.length);

Working Example

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, he asked for "length of json string", but I guess that's not what he wanted... –  Bergi May 18 '12 at 7:55
    
Thanks @Bergi. You can always upvote my answer if you really think it's right :) –  Jamie Dixon May 18 '12 at 8:06

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