Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a generic base class for value caching functionality.

public abstract class CachedValueProviderBase<T> : ICachedValueProvider<T> where T : class
{
    private Cache Cache { set; get; }
    protected string CacheKey { get; set; }
    protected int CacheSpanInMinutes { get; set; }

    private static readonly object _cacheLock = new object();

    public T Values
    {
        get
        {
            T value = Cache[CacheKey] as T;
            if (value == null)
            {
                lock (_cacheLock)
                {
                    value = Cache[CacheKey] as T;
                    if (value == null)
                    {
                        value = InitializeCache();
                    }
                }
            }

            return value;
        }
    }

    protected CachedValueProviderBase()
    {
        Cache = HttpRuntime.Cache;
        CacheSpanInMinutes = 15;
    }

    public T CacheValue(T value)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            lock (_cacheLock)
            {
                Cache.Insert(CacheKey, value, null, DateTime.UtcNow.AddMinutes(CacheSpanInMinutes),
                             Cache.NoSlidingExpiration);
            }
        }

        return value;
    }

    private T InitializeCache()
    {
        T value = Initialize();
        CacheValue(value);

        return value;
    }

    protected abstract T Initialize();
}

I have several classes that make use of this base class and as long as the T is different it is fine. When two sub classes use the same T, string for example, they share the same cache lock object. What is the best way of implementing the logic in a base class but still giving each sub class it's own cache lock object?

Update After the suggestions below I have updated my class:

public abstract class CachedValueProviderBase<T> : ICachedValueProvider<T> where T : class
    {
        private Cache Cache { set; get; }
        protected string CacheKey { get; set; }
        protected int CacheSpanInMinutes { get; set; }
        private object _cacheLock = new object();

        public T Values
        {
            get
            {
                T value = Cache[CacheKey] as T;
                if (value == null)
                {
                    lock (_cacheLock)
                    {
                        value = Cache[CacheKey] as T;
                        if (value == null)
                        {
                            value = InitializeCache();
                        }
                    }
                }

                return value;
            }
        }

        protected CachedValueProviderBase()
        {
            Cache = HttpRuntime.Cache;
            CacheSpanInMinutes = 15;
        }

        public T CacheValue(T value)
        {
            if (value != null)
            {
                Cache.Insert(CacheKey, value, null, DateTime.UtcNow.AddMinutes(CacheSpanInMinutes),
                             Cache.NoSlidingExpiration);

            }

            return value;
        }

        private T InitializeCache()
        {
            T value = Initialize();
            CacheValue(value);

            return value;
        }

        protected abstract T Initialize();
    }
}

My sub classes are now singletons so I could get rid of the static cachelock object making it an instance variable.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, just remove the static modifier on your cacheLock object.

That keyword forces the field to be shared between all instances of subclasses that share the same generic parameter type.

If you remove it, the cacheLock object will be private to each instance of a subclass, regardless of the generic parameter's type.

 private static readonly object _cacheLock = new object();

Should be :

 private readonly object _cacheLock = new object();

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer
    
This is running on a webserver so I still have to lock the cache for multiple threads. When removing static there could be more than one thread initializing the cache. –  b3n May 18 '12 at 8:40
    
Then you should consider using the singleton pattern for your cache providers, so that you have a single cache regardless of the thread accessing it, while keeping a unique cache lock for each cache instance. –  T. Fabre May 18 '12 at 8:46
    
@b3n If you are using .net 4.0 you can use Lazy<T> for thread-safe ininitalization. Anyway, static locks for instance methods are bad thing. –  undefined May 18 '12 at 8:46
    
If I follow the singleton path, how can I keep my code above in a base class? I would have to pull down the cache lock to the sub class so the base class would break where it tries to lock. –  b3n May 18 '12 at 9:05
    
Never mind, it doest have to be static then. Missed that. –  b3n May 18 '12 at 9:06

I had to take a good look at your code, to find out if it was correct. Once I noticed your cache is a HttpRuntime.Cache, it made sense. The HttpRuntime.Cache is thread-safe. Otherwise you would have had several thread-safety problems. With your current, code I advice you to do the following:

private string CacheKey { get; set; }

protected CachedValueProviderBase(string cacheKey)
{
    this.CacheKey = cacheKey + "_" + typeof(T).FullName;
}

By supplying the cacheKey as constructor argument and making the property private (or readonly would do), you prevent it from being changed by later on. By appending the type name to the key, you prevent cache conflicts since everybody is using the same cache.

One last note. The lock in the CacheValue method is redundant, since the Cache is thread-safe.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice catch ! I missed that point... –  T. Fabre May 18 '12 at 9:16
    
So I can basically get rid of the cache lock object seeing that Cache is threadsafe? –  b3n May 18 '12 at 9:20
    
Basically, yes :) –  T. Fabre May 18 '12 at 9:22
    
Great thanks. That makes it easy! –  b3n May 18 '12 at 9:23
    
It depends. When looking at your code I got the idea that Values gets called from multiple threads and that you wanted to prevent InitializeCache from being called multiple times. If that's that case, the lock is in place. If you don't care for the value to be created multiple times (and one gets thrown away), in that case the lock is redundant. –  Steven May 18 '12 at 9:24

I handled this by implementing an abstract method in my base class GetCacheLockObject().

protected abstract object GetCacheLockObject();

Each derived class then returns its own reference to the cache lock object:

private static readonly object _cacheLockObject = new Object();

protected override object GetCacheLockObject()
{
    return _cacheLockObject;
}

Calls to lock in the shared base class caching code then reference this method rather than an object in the base class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.