Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We are using the wonderful FSUnit for our unit testing. This works fine, except the bodies of our tests insist on using full F# syntax (with 'in' at the end of each line etc.) instead of #light syntax. For example:

module MyTests

open System
open NUnit.Framework
open FsUnit
open MyModule

[<TestFixture>] 
type ``Given a valid file`` () =

    let myFile = createSomeFile()

    [<Test>] member x.
     ``Processing the file succeeds`` () =
        let actual = processFile myFile in
        actual |> should be True

Note the 'in' at the end of the first line of the test. Without that, the test won't compile - which is fine for short tests but is becoming a pain for longer test methods. We've tried adding an explicit #light in the source but that seems to make no difference. This is part of a large project with many modules, all of which - other than the test modules - are happily using light syntax (without any explicit #light). What's triggering full syntax in the test modules?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to use a bit different indentation when writing members of the class. The following should be fine:

[<TestFixture>]  
type ``Given a valid file`` () = 
    let myFile = createSomeFile() 

    [<Test>] 
    member x.``Processing the file succeeds`` () = 
        let actual = processFile myFile
        actual |> should be True 

The first problem is that the name of the member should be indented further than . and the second problem is that the body of the member should be indented further than the member keyword - in your version, the keyword is written after [<Test>] so it would work if you indented the body further.

Adding in solves the problem, because that's telling the compiler more explicitly how to interpret the code (and so it does not rely on indentation rules).

Aside - with some unit testing frameworks, it is also possible to use module which gives you a bit lighter syntax (but I'm not sure how that works if you need some initialization - i.e. to load a file):

[<TestFixture>]  
module ``Given a valid file`` = 
    let myFile = createSomeFile() 

    [<Test>] 
    let ``Processing the file succeeds`` () = 
        let actual = processFile myFile
        actual |> should be True 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tomas. A full, multiparagraph answer with formatting within 10 minutes of the question. :-) –  Kit May 18 '12 at 9:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.