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I'm using UDP socket. The server application sends to the client information about how much time the client should transmit data to server. Then, the client begins transmission during this time by sending specific packets.

So I need a way to determine if data were sent to wire after Sendto() to find out how much time the client is sending in real. Does it exist?

OS: Windows 7

I tried to use perfomance counters (Network interface \ Output Queue Length) but it is always 0;

One more way I know is to set SO_SNDBUF ( setsockopt() )to the size of packet to send. So sendto() blocks until the send socket buffer is full (previous packet isn't sent to network interfrace buffer). But it seems that it doesn't work, just because it works only with socket buffer not network interface buffer.

I'm also interested in solutions for Linux.

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UDP is unreliable (by design). I'm not sure what exactly you're trying to do, but that's something you can't work around. If you need to know if something received a message, use TCP or some other protocol that is reliable. –  Mat May 18 '12 at 9:08
    
Thank you for comment. I don't need to know if something received a message. The question is WHEN something send it. I mean sending to wire, not putting in socket buffer or network interface buffer. I need it just to know how much time the client is sending data. –  Dmitry May 18 '12 at 9:18
    
That information has little value since you're not even guaranteed that if will ever be sent, and if it is, absolutely no guarantee that the packet will be received. –  Mat May 18 '12 at 9:29
    
"That information has little value since you're not even guaranteed that if will ever be sent". UDP doesn't garantee sending? –  Dmitry May 18 '12 at 9:34
    
No. A successful sendto tells you the OS put your packet in a buffer. That's all. The OS can discard it right after that if it has better things to do with that memory. –  Mat May 18 '12 at 9:53

2 Answers 2

I need a way to determine if data were sent to wire after Sendto() to find out how much time the client is sending in real. Does it exist?

As for whether sendto() successfully transmitted the packet was sent to the client, that's probably more work than you need to do.

To ensure the clients only send in a certain timeslot, you need to include the time left to transmit in your server's packets. The clients should also maintain an estimate of how much time it takes to get to the server through the network. Use these two numbers to estimate the time left for client to transmit.

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it won't help because the client has to know how much time it can send. For instance, it sent two packets (of specific format) and it has to know can it send more or not? (Is timeslot (time to transmit) elaspsed or not) –  Dmitry May 18 '12 at 9:40
    
You said nothing about a timeslot in your question. Please modify your question with a full description of what your protocol does on the server and client side –  Mike Pennington May 18 '12 at 9:44
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Sorry. "The server application sends to the client information about how much time the client should transmit data to server". I mean this time by "timeslot". Maybe I use wrong termin. –  Dmitry May 18 '12 at 9:49

Read Mat's comment above. Generally with UDP you have to assume that the data is sent as soon as you call send() method. There is no way to ascertain that the data WAS actually sent and/or received.

Edit: I meant that there is NO way to ascertain that data has reached intended destination. You can check that the data is being sent, you can even trace it on route to some extent. But there is no way to make sure that the data was received, even if your intended recipient is reachable it does not mean that they are listening...

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In fact there is, you can set up RGMII/XGMII loopback on a MAC, for example, and match packets. Or you can mirror outgoing ports and setup a loopback, that will be a bit more expensive but... will tell you for sure :) As for the practicality of this solution - doesn't make much sense. –  user405725 May 18 '12 at 12:46

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