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I'm quite the beginner when it comes to JavaScript but I recently ran into a problem which I could reproduce with a small example:

function TimerTest(panelId)
{
    this.PanelID = panelId;
}

TimerTest.prototype.Start = function()
{
    var self = this;

    $(document.getElementById(this.PanelID)).everyTime("1s", "Test", function(){
        self.Print();
    });
}

TimerTest.prototype.Print = function()
{
    $("#debug").append("<div>triggered...</div>");
}

function Remove()
{
    $("#main").empty();
    $("#main").html("I'm done!");
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    var timer = new TimerTest("timerpanel");
    timer.Start();
});

Run in JSFiddle

After calling Remove() the object seems to still exist and print "triggered..." :(

I use HTML5's history feature to load content via AJAX. What I'm basically experiencing is that I have a embedded Google Map with markers and a timer to update those markers every once in a while. When navigating away from that page I can still see in FireBug AJAX-calls to update the markers. Which means to me the object didn't get destroyed even though its panel was removed from the DOM? JQuery's documentation on empty() though says it removes all DOM elements and its data.

I'm a little confused. I know I could call "stopTime()" on the object before navigating away but that's not my issue. The timer in the example is just there so I can actually see that the TimerTest-object still lives (i.e. my Google Map still lives!).

share|improve this question
    
Kill it with fire! =D 'if (TimerTest) delete TimerTest;' this is called brute-force programming nowadays... =D –  benqus May 18 '12 at 9:10
    
Your JSFiddle contains Malware so says Google Chrome. –  Tim B James May 18 '12 at 9:11
    
I thought "delete" doesn't actually delete anything but just sets the variable to "null"? –  Alex K. May 18 '12 at 9:11
    
Malware? I'm sorry about that but it's just the code from above. Maybe it reports it as malware because of the repeating timer events? –  Alex K. May 18 '12 at 9:12
1  
@benqus: That won't work nevertheless. a) delete is for properties, and b) the timeout function still holds a reference to it –  Bergi May 18 '12 at 9:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Trying to run your fiddle, Chrome complains about jquery.offput.ca, which it calls a site "known to distribute malware". I get the same warning if I go to the demos for that jQuery plug-in. So I haven't been able to use that actual code. As of your update, I can use your actual code, so see the very end of this answer for an answer using your original code. I'll leave the non-timer-plugin answer in place, though.

The element may or may not remain in memory, it depends entirely on how the timers plug-in works. The important thing, though, is that regardless of whether the element is in memory, nothing is stopping the timer. You need code to do that.

I've never used that timers plug-in, but presumably it has some means of telling the timer to stop, probably via a call you make on the jQuery wrapper of the element you've attached the timer to. So in your Remove function, you'll need a way to identify elements with timers on them so you can stop them.

Here's an example of doing that without the timers plug-in, to demonstrate the concepts. Here's how I've done this:

  1. When I create the setInterval timer, I remember the timer handle on an attribute called data-timer-handle. You may or may not need that, but you'll want to put some kind of marker on the element so you can tell the timer plug-in to stop.

  2. In Remove, before clearing out #main, I find any children it has with the data-timer-handle attribute and clear the interval timer.

Live copy | source:

HTML:

<div id="main">
    <div id="timerpanel">I'm the timer panel</div>
</div>
<input type="button" id="removeButton" value="Remove It">
<div id="debug"></div>

JavaScript:

function TimerTest(panelId)
{
    this.PanelID = panelId;
}

TimerTest.prototype.Start = function()
{
    var self = this;

    // Start the timer
    var handle = setInterval(function() {
        self.Print();
    }, 1000);

    // Remember the handle on a data-timer-handle property
    // on the element.
    $(document.getElementById(this.PanelID)).attr("data-timer-handle", handle);
}

TimerTest.prototype.Print = function()
{
    $("#debug").append("<div>triggered...</div>");
}

function Remove()
{
    var main = $("#main");
    // Find any elements with timers on them, stop them
    main.find("[data-timer-handle]").each(function() {
        clearInterval($(this).attr("data-timer-handle"));
    });
    main.html("I'm done!");
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    var timer = new TimerTest("timerpanel");
    timer.Start();
    $("#removeButton").click(function() {
        Remove();
    });
});

If I were writing a timers plug-in that attached timers to elements, I'd definitely add something to the elements (a data-* attribute, a class, whatever) to allow you to find them again. But then, I'd also provide an option for automatically cancelling the timer if the element is removed from the DOM (so you wouldn't need to find and stop them), by having each timer tick check to see if the element was still attached. (I probably wouldn't enable that by default, but it'd be an option.)


Re your comment below:

I have a question about your code though: It does indeed stop the timer, but how do I know it actually destroyed the TimerTest-object? The timer was just a way for me to tell. AFAIK the timer itself didn't hold a reference to the TimerTest-object so why is that object still alive? You can tell by modifing Print() to print "this.PanelID"`

Ah, but the timer did keep a reference to the TimerTest instance: The function you pass into the timer is a closure. It has a reference to everything that was in scope where it was created, including the self variable that referred to the TimerTest object (of course, otherwise self.Print() wouldn't work). So as long as that function exists, it will keep the TimerTest instance in memory.

So what keeps that function in memory? The reference to it from the timer. As long as the timer is alive, it has a reference to the function, and that keeps the function in memory. In my example above, clearInterval removes the reference to the function, making it eligible for garbage collection; which means that the function no longer keeps the things it closes over in memory. If the function was the only thing with an outstanding reference to the TimerTest instance, that means the TimerTest instance becomes eligible for garbage collection.

In my code, nothing kept the element in memory (that may not be true of the timers plug-in you're using), but the TimerTest instance was kept alive by the function as long as that function was being used by the browser's setInterval stuff.

More to explore:


And now that your fiddle doesn't link to that (perhaps) dodgy site:

I'm surprised to find that the timer plug-in doesn't seem to add anything to the element to make it easy to find again. No matter, it's trivial for us to.

Change Start to mark the element — here I used a class:

TimerTest.prototype.Start = function()
{
    var self = this;

    $("#" + this.PanelID)
        .addClass("hastimer")
        .everyTime("1s", "Test", function(){
            self.Print();
    });
};

(I also used jQuery to look up the element, rather than document.getElementById. And you want the semicolon at the end of the function expression.)

And change Remove to stop the timer on all elements with that class:

function Remove()
{
    var main = $("#main");
    main.find(".hastimer").stopTime();
    main.html("I'm done!");
}

(There's no need to call empty before calling html; html calls empty.)

Updated fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
I already updated my JSFiddle to another URL of the plugin-script (googlecode), so hopefully Chrome won't complain anymore :) I have a question about your code though: It does indeed stop the timer, but how do I know it actually destroyed the TimerTest-object? The timer was just a way for me to tell. AFAIK the timer itself didn't hold a reference to the TimerTest-object so why is that object still alive? You can tell by modifing Print() to print "this.PanelID" ... –  Alex K. May 18 '12 at 10:11
    
@AlexK.: If you "already" updated your fiddle, update your question to refer to it so people don't waste their time with / get discouraged by the old one. –  T.J. Crowder May 18 '12 at 10:28
    
@AlexK.: I've updated the answer to address your question above (see the end, under the break). –  T.J. Crowder May 18 '12 at 10:34
    
@AlexK.: And as you were accepting the answer, I updated your updated fiddle to show how to solve this with your original code. Glad that helped! –  T.J. Crowder May 18 '12 at 10:40
1  
@AlexK.: Yes, because you've assigned a reference to it to a global variable timer. If you changed the code in that script element to new TimerTest().Start(); you wouldn't have that problem, because you didn't store the reference anywhere. If you really need the var though (you don't in that example, but maybe you're doing more), wrap it all in a self-executing function: <script>(function() { var timer = new TimerTest(); timer.Start(); timer.DoSomethingElse(); })());</script> That way the var is a local in the function, and as you create no closures, nothing keeps it around. –  T.J. Crowder May 18 '12 at 10:50
show 4 more comments

Even though you're removing the #main element from the DOM, the TimerTest still holds a reference to it. Elements can exist, but not be in the DOM (see detach() for instance).

Objects are only reclaimed by the garbage collector when no references to it exist.

jQuery's empty() method will remove the element from the DOM, and will delete any data that jQuery stores about the element that was added via the data() method, as well as event handlers.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not removing "#main" though, only its contents ("#timerpanel"). I know "this.Panel" holds a reference to the panel, but I've also tried it with "this.PanelID" and then use that in Start() but it produced the same result :( –  Alex K. May 18 '12 at 9:18
    
jsfiddle.net/XYcDn/2 That's the updated example... My first suspicion was of course the reference I still held with this.Panel, but changing it to just hold the ID didn't seem to work either. –  Alex K. May 18 '12 at 9:21
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