Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just started with exception handling in C++ using try and catch blocks. I have a text file with some data and I am reading this file using ifstream and getline as shown below,

ifstream file;
file.open("C:\\Test.txt", ios::in);
string line;
string firstLine;
if (getline(file, line, ' '))
{
    firstLine = line;
    getline(file, line);
}

I would like to know how to implement exception handling in case file.open fails to open the specified file because it does not exist in the given path, for example there is no Test.txt in C:

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

By default iostreams do not throw exceptions. Instead they set some error flags. You can always test if the previous operation succeeded with a contextual conversion to bool:

ifstream file;
file.open("C:\\Test.txt", ios::in);
if (!file) {
    // do stuff when the file fails
} else {
    string line;
    string firstLine;
    if (getline(file, line, ' '))
    {
        firstLine = line;
        getline(file, line);
    }
}

You can turn on exceptions with the exceptions member function. I find that more often than not, doing this doesn't help much because you can no longer do things like while(getline(file, line)): such an loop would only exit with an exception.

ifstream file;
file.exceptions(std::ios::failbit);
// now any operation that sets the failbit error flag on file throws

try {
    file.open("C:\\Test.txt", ios::in);
} catch (std::ios_base::failure &fail) {
    // opening the file failed! do your stuffs here
}

// disable exceptions again as we use the boolean conversion interface 
file.exceptions(std::ios::goodbit);

string line;
string firstLine;
if (getline(file, line, ' '))
{
    firstLine = line;
    getline(file, line);
}

Most of the time, I don't think enabling exceptions on iostreams is worth the hassle. The API works better with them off.

share|improve this answer
    
contextual conversion to bool which means an explicit bool() in C++11 and an implicit conversion to void* interpreted as bool in c++03? –  rubenvb May 18 '12 at 9:44
    
@rubenvb Well, the term didn't exist in C++03, but that's the equivalent, yeah. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 18 '12 at 9:46
    
@rubenvb Thank you. But how do I know which throws an exception and which doesn't? –  capricorn_heitus May 18 '12 at 9:54
    
@capricorn_heitus almost any operation on streams can fail. Usually you check their documentation and see if they can set any error flags. If they can and you enable exceptions, they will throw. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 18 '12 at 9:59
    
@rubenvb Turning on exceptions and doing stuff like that looks like a nightmare for me. I better go with simpler handling with if and else statements. Thank you for the simpler one :) –  capricorn_heitus May 18 '12 at 9:59
show 2 more comments

IOstreams give you the option of turning on exceptions for various state bits. The reference has a very clear example which is exactly what you were asking for.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't know about calling that site 'the STL reference', but +1 for pointing out the ability to make it throw exceptions. –  Corbin May 18 '12 at 9:51
    
Hmm, confusing STL and iostreams (which are part of Standart C++ Library) is not a good thing. Edited the answer. Thanks. –  dtatulea May 18 '12 at 9:57
    
Well I meant it for two reasons. The major one was that as far as I know, cplusplus.com is not maintained by the standards committee. The other one was the very minor point that STL != C++ standard library. –  Corbin May 18 '12 at 10:00
    
@dtatulea Your discussion is out of my scope. Nevertheless, thanks for the link. –  capricorn_heitus May 18 '12 at 10:03
add comment

Well, it all depends what you want to do if the file doesn't exist.

The code as it is at the moment (assuming this is main) will just exit the process.

However if this is a function call then you probably want to add exception handling around the call to this function.

E.g.

try
{
    OpenAndReadFile( std::string filename );
}
catch ( std::ifstream::failure e )
{
    // do soemthing else
}
catch ( OtherException e )
{
}
catch ( ... )
{
    // All others
}

This assumes that exception throwing is turned on for the ifstream.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.