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I do use lots of AsyncTasks within Activities as private inner classes. One thing that puzzles me since the beginning is what context do I get within onPostExecute()?

If you look at the stripped down example shown below you can use getString() within onPostExecute(). What context is used for that call? The Activity may have changed during doInBackground (e.g. OrientationChange) so it can't be that context.

Currently I patch the Activity context (task.context = this) and use that specific context (context.getString()).

My question: Is it save to use getString() within onPostExecute() of an Inner Class AsyncTask without using the context of the surrounding Activity?

Many thanks in advance.

public class MyActivity extends Activity {

    /* package */ MyActivity context;

    private class MyAsyncTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {

        public MyAsyncTask(final MyActivity context) {
            super();

            this.context = context;
        }

        @Override
        protected Cursor doInBackground(/* ... */) {
            // ...
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(/* ... */) {
            if (context != null) {
                // Currently I do use that
                String s = context.getString(R.string.mytext);
                context.task = null;
            }

            // Would this be save?
            String s2 = getString(R.string.mytext);
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPreExecute (/* ... */) {
            // ...
        }
    }

    /* package */ MyAsyncTask  task;

    @Override
    public void onCreate(final Bundle bundle) {
        // ...

        Bundle bundleExtras = getIntent().getExtras();
        if (bundleExtras != null) {
            task = (MyAsyncTask) getLastNonConfigurationInstance();
            if (task != null) {
                task.context = this;
                // ...
            } else {
                task = new MyAsyncTask(this);
                task.execute();
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Object onRetainNonConfigurationInstance() {
        if (task != null) {
            // ...
            task.context = null;
        }

        return task;
    }
}
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is it save to use getString() within onPostExecute() of an Inner Class AsyncTask without using the context of the surrounding Activity?

No it's not safe. Being an inner class in that activity your MyAsyncTask class you'll have a reference to MyActivity when it is created. So, if MyActivity is killed for any reason (like rotation), in the onPostExecute callback you'll end up with MyAsyncTask holding a reference of the killed MyActivity instance.

Using a reference to the Activity it's safer because you update that reference to always point to a valid instance of MyActivity. Maybe you'll also want to invalidate the Activity directly in onRetainNonConfigurationInstance with null to make sure you don't touch it(if the MyAsyncTask reaches the onPostExecute until you setup the MyActivity again) until you have a valid reference.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds reasonable. So "getString()" without my own patched "context." in onPostExecute() is simply valid because there's a surrounding Activity around the AsyncTask? So it's more a Java thing than a Android thing. Will take your answer. Thanks. – Harald Wilhelm May 18 '12 at 10:27
    
"So it's more a Java thing than a Android thing" , yes you're accessing a method of the outer class in the inner class. In Android this is to avoid because the outer class(the Activity) could be killed independently by the system. – Luksprog May 18 '12 at 10:33

You are initializing your instance of MyAsyncTask() with the this pointer in:

task = new MyAsyncTask(this);

In onPostExecute you're accessing the class member context initialized with the supplied pointer. Your context is that of the enclosing class i.e. MyActivity.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's how I'm doing it currently. My question was: What happens if I use "getString()" instead of the "context.getString()"? Is it save? And what default Context do I get in onPostExecute() when not using my own? – Harald Wilhelm May 18 '12 at 10:19
2  
Sorry for misunderstanding. Since it's an enclosed class it will still get the context of the enclosing class i.e. MyActivity. In this context, these two are equivalent - context.getString() and getString(). – Code Poet May 18 '12 at 10:24

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