Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a stored proc in oracle 11g server that has an out variable of record. I cannot edit this procedure. I am creating a function that will call the procedure and return the information in the record set. I looked at the following question asked here: past question

My Question is can I create a type of table for a record and query it directly in SQL? Or do I need to convert the record to type object and create a table type for it to query directly?

share|improve this question
    
What RDMS are you using? What you can do inside a stored procedure varies by platform. –  Shannon Severance Jun 30 '09 at 17:49
    
Sorry I'm using oracle 11g –  Slowbie Jun 30 '09 at 18:01
add comment

5 Answers 5

RECORD is a PL/SQL concept. So we cannot create a TABLE TYPE based on a RECORD and use that TYPE in a SQL statement. SQL only recognises TYPEs which are created in SQL.

So, if I understood your scenario correctly, you need to create an object and/or a nested table in SQL. Then your function can call the procedure and translate the RECORD to the nested table. The nested table can then be returned or pipelined.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The question your link points to is tagged Oracle, so I'm assuming that's what you're using.

The easiest way is probably returning a CURSOR:

SQL> VAR cr_dual REFCURSOR

SQL> BEGIN
  2          OPEN    :cr_dual FOR
  3          SELECT  1
  4          FROM    dual
  5          UNION ALL
  6          SELECT  2
  7          FROM    dual;
  8  END;
  9  /

Процедура PL/SQL успешно завершена.

SQL> PRINT cr_dual

         1
----------
         1
         2
share|improve this answer
add comment

What ended up doing for this problem was to create a view based on the stored procedure logic and query directly from it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

if you are receiving only one record and you know the record definition, you should be able to the field of the record directly by name.

for example:

TYPE myrecord IS RECORD (
       itemA NUMBER,
       itemB myTable.columnName%TYPE
  );

when you have a record of myrecord type, you can reference itemA in a manner like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION myFunction(theRecord IN myrecord%TYPE) RETURN NUMBER
IS
BEGIN    
   RETURN recordInstance.itemA;
END myFunction;

note that you may be able to get around this in your calling code be simply handling the record type that the original procedure returns.

share|improve this answer
    
That would work great if I only needed one part of the record, but I need multiple parts of the record. The procedure returns a record of a mailing address so it contains several variables. City, Zip, Street number, street name, street suffix. And a few others. I was hoping to to cast the record to a table so i could select from it in a sql statement instead of changing the code behind of 40 of our apps that use addressing. –  Slowbie Jun 30 '09 at 18:14
    
@Slowbie, i see. how many fields are you hoping to return, or do you need a concatinated varchar of the address? i guess it would be good to see what you want as the return value from your function. –  akf Jun 30 '09 at 18:29
add comment

You can try varray.

First -

create or replace type addr_type
as object
(name   varchar2(20)
,city   varchar2(20)
)

And create your varray as

create or replace type varr_addr as varray(10) of addr_type
/

Now you can return work with varr_addr. An example:

SQL> create or replace procedure ret_user_addr (p_out out varr_addr)
  2  is
  3  begin
  4    p_out := varr_addr(addr_type('NAME1','CITY1'),addr_type('NAME2','CITY2'));
  5  end;
  6  /

Procedure created.

SQL> sho err
No errors.

Now you need have the out variable configured correctly from where you call.And you can select from table(VARIABLE_NAME) as you would do.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.