Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I take care of a script that for each release copies out to a release-folder for example release/version_0.0.2. I also set a symlink to this version (the folder release/version_0.0.2) called latest. To run the script you have to be in the folder the script is in (bad design decision with relative paths).

My problem is the users of this script want almost all the time use the latest version. So they set latest to work directory and run the script there from. But when I release a new version they will automatic use the old one, so want the script (written in bash) to ask the user if he/she want to use this old one.

My ide was to check if the script is run from latest, but when I change the symlink the $PWD is change when I run the script but not in the shell.

Here is a example:

selnx183:~> cd latest/
selnx183:~/latest> echo $PWD
/home/ejohael/latest
selnx183:~/latest> ps
  PID TTY          TIME CMD
11082 pts/190  00:00:00 tcsh
32527 pts/190  00:00:00 ps
selnx183:~/latest> pwdx 11082
11082: /home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
selnx183:~/latest> ./test 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
/home/ejohael/latest
/home/ejohael/latest
/home/ejohael/latest
/home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
~/latest

-------------------------------------------------------------------
/home/ejohael/latest
selnx183:~/latest> rm ~/latest
selnx183:~/latest> ln -s ~/release/version_0.0.3/ ~/latest
selnx183:~/latest> echo $PWD
/home/ejohael/latest
selnx183:~/latest> ps
  PID TTY          TIME CMD
11082 pts/190  00:00:00 tcsh
32727 pts/190  00:00:00 ps
selnx183:~/latest> pwdx 11082
11082: /home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
selnx183:~/latest> ./test 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
/home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
/home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
/home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
/home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
~/release/version_0.0.2

-------------------------------------------------------------------
/home/ejohael/release/version_0.0.2
selnx183:~/latest>

The test look as follow:

#!/bin/bash

echo `env` > log

echo "-------------------------------------------------------------------"

echo $PWD
echo `pwd`
echo `cd -L . ; pwd`
echo `cd -P . ; pwd`
echo `dirs`
echo $OLDPWD

echo "-------------------------------------------------------------------"

pushd `dirname -- $0` > /dev/null
echo `pwd -L`
popd > /dev/null

I do not want to force the user always use the latest version but I what to find out when the user think it uses the latest version and warn the user.

Edit: I want only get this if the user is running from a old latest, not when the user run a old version from release/version_x.x.x.

share|improve this question
    
A script that asked me questions about installation would annoy me. Think about providing an installer, perhaps? Or fix it so that the user doesn't have to be in the directory (which would annoy me even more). That way, the user is in control and can set things so that they use the version they want without discussion from the script trying to second guess their intent. The installer can switch the 'latest' symlink to itself (if it doesn't find a more recent version already in place; think of reinstalling an old version). Having the version-numbered locations is a good feature. –  Jonathan Leffler May 18 '12 at 20:29

2 Answers 2

Not sure I understand completely what the situation is, but do you know about the readlink command? readlink latest will print the name of the file/folder that latest points to. Your script would know what latest should point to; any deviation from that can trigger a warning to the user.

share|improve this answer

I would think about something like

[ $(stat -c%i .) != $(stat -L -c%i ../latest) ] && echo not in the latest directory
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.