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I am currently implementing Facebook Login on my website for the first time and I have some doubts on how secure this is.

I already have a database with users and for each one of them, I store an email address, so I really need to check whether an email address I get from Facebook is already present in my database or not, otherwise I would have some problems with duplicate users. If a user is already present, I simply merge data from Facebook into the existing account on my website and I connect the user. Otherwise, I create an account for him.

But here is the thing:

  1. Alice connects on my website using email address alice@users.com but Alice is not registered on Facebook with that email address

  2. Bob registers on Facebook using Alice's email address alice@users.com and verify the account using an SMS received on any phone number (I checked and this is possible, an account can be verified without clicking on the link received by email). I agree that Alice would be notified on her email address but still, this is possible.

  3. Bob triggers login on my website using facebook connect, while being connected on Facebook using Alice's email address.

  4. Bob's Facebook account is active and verified, and I have to assume he already has an account on my website as alice@users.com is already in my database, so I connect him instead of Alice and he can use my website on Alice's account.

=> I tried this scenario on several websites and I could connect on someone else's account (a fake Facebook account that I created ;) ), as long as I knew the email address.

Does anyone have an idea on how to prevent these situations?

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In the facebook API, the user has a "verified" field. Is it only true if the user has verified the email, or also if he verified the phone number ? –  madjar May 18 '12 at 11:58
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According to Facebook documentation, a user is considered as "verified" if he "registers for mobile", "confirms her account via SMS" or "enters a valid credit card" so I guess this field won't help unfortunately –  Yacine S. May 18 '12 at 12:02
    
Just a thought: It's possible to change your facebook email address. Say I registered as alice@users.com, then changed my email on facebook to bob@users.com. Now I make another account there as alice@users.com. If you have a registration from alice@facebook.com, which account is it from? That depends! –  Enno May 18 '12 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If it is true that Facebook doesn't need to confirm email and then acts as an openid-style provider, then this is shocking! But i guess the answer is already in your question - don't link/merge accounts. Or at least, don't do so from a facebook login attempt without first confirming the email yourself.

You can't change what friendface does, so you need to treat the email address provided by facebook connect as untrusted data. If a Facebook-connect login attempt is made with an email that already has a native account on your site, then send them an email confirmation code yourself - and do what facebook failed to do.

Another option is once a user is logged in to a native account, you could allow them to link the facebook account from there, should they wish to. This also allows you to support facebook login for users that have a different email address registered on the two sites.

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Allowing them to link the accounts with an email verification would pretty much ensure you know who the user is. –  Lix May 18 '12 at 11:59
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@Lix ermm... yeah. damn good point - answer updated :-) –  Cheekysoft May 18 '12 at 12:00
    
Good point, I think this should be the most secure solution. However, people are getting more and more used to the fact that once you click on the Facebook connect button, you are logged in straight away on the website. But I think an email validation from my website seems to be necessary! –  Yacine S. May 18 '12 at 12:05
    
Yacine, remember that in a huge majority of cases people will "log straight in"; you only need this confirmation when merging accounts - and i doubt you'll get all that many users that create a native account and then log in with friendface. The only complication is that you want to merge account data, so in the few cases that this comes up, you go the extra step to confirm the email before giving over a user's secrets to what is essentially a different account. –  Cheekysoft May 18 '12 at 12:07
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@Ramhound I would really prefer merging the accounts as far as I'm concerned because I think users would expect this behaviour –  Yacine S. May 18 '12 at 12:22

this i think it's not a facebook bug/flow. The problem is in the algorithm that is used by the sites that accept facebook login.

Facebook logins should not be accepted if that email address is already registered in the site. It may called "facebook login" but not forget that it really is a new account of the site database and should be treated like one.

In conclusion, if the site uses e-mail addresses as unique identification, should not accept facebook logins with the same e-mail address.

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I already have a database with users and for each one of them, I store an email address, so I really need to check whether an email address I get from Facebook is already present in my database or not, otherwise I would have some problems with duplicate users. If a user is already present, I simply merge data from Facebook into the existing account on my website and I connect the user. Otherwise, I create an account for him.

This isn't how you should handle it. You should allow a user on their own to link to a Facebook account. You could also allow new users the ability to only use their Facebook login information. You should not store the Facebook account's registered email used to create an account. This means that a Facebook registered to Bob@Cats.com and an account on your website registered to Bob@Cats.com would be entirely two different accounts.

Alice connects on my website using email address alice@users.com but Alice is not registered on Facebook with that email address

This means Alice would not login through the Facebook OAuth process.

Bob registers on Facebook using Alice's email address alice@users.com and verify the account using an SMS received on any phone number (I checked and this is possible, an account can be verified without clicking on the link received by email). I agree that Alice would be notified on her email address but still, this is possible.

This isn't really a problem. Alice has the ability to delete the Facebook account.

Bob triggers login on my website using facebook connect, while being connected on Facebook using Alice's email address.

Why are you worried about this. If Bob created the Facebook account then it is his Facebook account. Unless Alice links Bob's Facebook account to her account on your website what does it matter? All you should store is what is required to keep track of a profile for that Facebook account exactly like this website does. Since you will have a "classic" system you need to make the linking process manual unless you get rid of it that is your choice.

Bob's Facebook account is active and verified, and I have to assume he already has an account on my website as alice@users.com is already in my database, so I connect him instead of Alice and he can use my website on Alice's account

The linking process should be a manual process by Alice.

Does anyone have an idea on how to prevent these situations?

They are not actual problems that need to be solved. In every case a manual linking process should be used. If you don't want to make users go through that process then make ALL users only use Facebook to log into your website.

I tried this scenario on several websites and I could connect on someone else's account (a fake Facebook account that I created ;) ), as long as I knew the email address.

I promise you that you were not connecting to another person's account. You were creating a new account, connected to the Facebook account you created, you could do the same on any website that supported OAuth.

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Just to answer, I was really connecting to an existing account and I knew that because on Alice's account, I put some data in her profile that I could retrieve while connecting Bob via Facebook (using the same email as Alice). I don't think that all websites work this way but some do. –  Yacine S. May 18 '12 at 12:17
    
@YacineS. - Well those websites are not doing it the correct way and their webmasters are idiots. –  Ramhound May 18 '12 at 13:30

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