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The structure for the three tables.

Booking

CREATE TABLE `booking` (
`bookingID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`receipt_no` int(11) NOT NULL,
`client` varchar(32) NOT NULL,
`operator` varchar(32) NOT NULL,
`discount` int(11) NOT NULL,
`total_amount` int(64) NOT NULL,
`amount_paid` int(32) NOT NULL,
`balance` int(32) NOT NULL,
`date` date NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`bookingID`)
ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=209 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

Jobtitle

CREATE TABLE `jobtitle` (
`jobtitleID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`jobtitle` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`quantity` int(11) NOT NULL,
`amount` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
`jobtypeID` int(11) NOT NULL,
`bookingID` int(11) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`jobtitleID`)
ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=463 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

First_graphics_debtors

CREATE TABLE `first_graphics_debtors`
`id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`receipt_no` int(11) NOT NULL,
`date_paid` date NOT NULL,
`old_balance` int(32) NOT NULL,
`debtor_amount_paid` int(32) NOT NULL,
`new_balance` int(32) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=16 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

After inserting few data

Booking

+-----------+------------+----------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+
| bookingID | receipt_no | client   | operator | discount | total_amount | amount_paid | balance | date       |
+-----------+------------+----------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+
|       205 |  156872940 | Osaro    | Obi      |       10 |       156380 |      135000 |    5742 | 2012-05-15 |
|       206 |  227349168 | Amaka    | Stephen  |        4 |        73250 |       70320 |       0 | 2012-05-15 |
|       207 |  155732278 | Aghahowa | Ibori    |        0 |       116836 |       15000 |  101836 | 2012-05-15 |
|       208 |  753263343 | Chaka    | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 |
+-----------+------------+----------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+

Jobtitle

+------------+---------------------------+----------+--------+-----------+-----------+
| jobtitleID | jobtitle                  | quantity | amount | jobtypeID | bookingID |
+------------+---------------------------+----------+--------+-----------+-----------+
|        454 | A1 Full Colour            |       10 | 4334   |         1 |       205 |
|        455 | Complementry Card         |       20 | 5652   |         2 |       205 |
|        456 | A4 Printout (graphics)B/W |       25 | 2930   |         4 |       206 |
|        457 | Scan                      |        2 | 4334   |         5 |       207 |
|        458 | A4 Full Colour            |      199 | 500    |         3 |       207 |
|        459 | ID Card                   |        2 | 4334   |         2 |       207 |
|        460 | A3 Full Colour            |       10 | 4334   |         3 |       208 |
|        461 | Flex Banner               |       20 | 2930   |         2 |       208 |
|        462 | A2 Single Colour          |      199 | 650    |         1 |       208 |
+------------+---------------------------+----------+--------+-----------+-----------+

First_graphics_debtors

+----+------------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+
| id | receipt_no | date_paid  | old_balance | debtor_amount_paid | new_balance |
+----+------------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+
|  7 |  156872940 | 2012-05-15 |        5742 |               5000 |         742 |
|  8 |  156872940 | 2012-05-15 |        5742 |               5742 |           0 |
|  9 |  753263343 | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             152161 |           0 |
| 13 |  753263343 | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |              14524 |      137637 |
| 14 |  753263343 | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |               2000 |      150161 |
| 15 |  753263343 | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |               1000 |      151161 |
+----+------------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+

When I run this query:

SELECT `booking`.`receipt_no`, `client`, `operator`, `discount`, `total_amount`,
       `amount_paid`, `balance`, `date`, `jobtitle`, `quantity`, `amount`,
       `date_paid`, `old_balance`, `debtor_amount_paid`, `new_balance`
  FROM (`booking`)
  JOIN `jobtitle` ON `jobtitle`.`bookingID` = `booking`.`bookingID`
  JOIN `first_graphics_debtors`
    ON `first_graphics_debtors`.`receipt_no` = `booking`.`receipt_no`
 WHERE `booking`.`receipt_no` =  '753263343'
   AND `first_graphics_debtors`.`receipt_no` =  '753263343'
 GROUP BY `jobtitle`.`quantity`

I get this output:

+------------+--------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+------------------+----------+--------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+
| receipt_no | client | operator | discount | total_amount | amount_paid | balance | date       | jobtitle         | quantity | amount | date_paid  | old_balance | debtor_amount_paid | new_balance |
+------------+--------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+------------------+----------+--------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+
|  753263343 | Chaka  | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 | A3 Full Colour   |       10 | 4334   | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             152161 |           0 |
|  753263343 | Chaka  | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 | Flex Banner      |       20 | 2930   | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             152161 |           0 |
|  753263343 | Chaka  | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 | A2 Single Colour |      199 | 650    | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             152161 |           0 |
+------------+--------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+------------------+----------+--------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+

Data on the columns below are repeated three times, instead of getting data from the four rows relating to the receipt_no

date_paid, old_balance, debtor_amount_paid, new_balance

Expected result

+------------+--------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+------------------+----------+--------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+
| receipt_no | client | operator | discount | total_amount | amount_paid | balance | date       | jobtitle         | quantity | amount | date_paid  | old_balance | debtor_amount_paid | new_balance |
+------------+--------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+------------------+----------+--------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+
|  753263343 | Chaka  | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 | A3 Full Colour   |       10 | 4334   | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             152161 |           0 |
|  753263343 | Chaka  | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 | Flex Banner      |       20 | 2930   | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             14524  |     137637  |
|  753263343 | Chaka  | Stephen  |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | 2012-05-15 | A2 Single Colour |      199 | 650    | 2012-05-15 |      152161 |             2000   |      150161 |
+------------+--------+----------+----------+--------------+-------------+---------+------------+------------------+----------+--------+------------+-------------+--------------------+-------------+

Though,the expected output not complete, but maybe you can get the picture from the data on debtor_amount_paid and new_balance

share|improve this question
2  
If you want to get only 'date_paid, old_balance, debtor_amount_paid, new_balance' fields then why do you select all the other fields? Could you give us a table of results you want to get? – Sergey Kudriavtsev May 18 '12 at 11:48
    
Thank Sergey, i was struggling to make that edit. I will do that soon – sality May 18 '12 at 11:50
3  
+1 for including all the information with the schema and data. That definitely helps with SQL questions. It is amazing how often people say 'I have a table with columns x, y, z' never giving the table a name. For a question on SO, you should try to avoid horizontal scroll bars. The SQL is easily dealt with, but the results are not so easy. It would be easier (for you and for us) if you limited yourself to selecting and showing fewer fields. For example, the operator field is probably not crucial; the discount, total amount, amount paid are not immediately a problem; and so it goes on. – Jonathan Leffler May 18 '12 at 13:52
    
@sality: Without the GROUP BY, you have 3 rows in table Jobtitle and 4 rows in table First_graphics_debtors. Why do you expect 3 rows only in the result and which rows should be selected from those tables? – ypercubeᵀᴹ May 18 '12 at 14:24
    
@sality Do you want to align the jobtitle against first_graphics_debtor? Jobtitle has 3 matched rows on your condition, and first_graphics_debtor has 4. Shouldn't be your expected result be 4 rows? – Michael Buen May 19 '12 at 2:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I fully agree with what Travesty3 said about table aliases and backticks.

Your problem is, I think, that you are trying to combine what 'should' be two separate queries into one. For any given Booking, you can have an arbitrary number of Job Title entries, and completely independently of the Job Title information, you can have an arbitrary number of First Graphics Debtors entries. In the sample data for the sample Receipt 753263343, you have one Booking, three Job Title entries, and 4 First Graphic Debtors entries.

By default (without a GROUP BY clause), you would get 12 entries corresponding to the cross-product of the three sets of rows (1 x 3 x 4).

The GROUP BY in MySQL is different from most other DBMS; Standard SQL would not allow you to omit the non-aggregate columns from the GROUP BY clause (and all the columns are non-aggregate).

What I think you're after is an output result set similar to (using FGD as an abbreviation for First Graphics Debtors):

+-------------------+---------------------+---------------+
| Data from Booking | Data from Job Title | Data from FGD |
+-------------------+---------------------+---------------+
| Booking ID 208... | Job Title ID 460... | FGD ID 9      |
| Booking ID 208... | Job Title ID 461... | FGD ID 13     |
| Booking ID 208... | Job Title ID 462... | FGD ID 14     |
| Booking ID 208... | ...?????????????... | FGD ID 15     |
+-------------------+---------------------+---------------+

The most plausible set of values for the question marks is probably a set of NULLs.

You would probably be better off, though, using two separate queries, one to fetch the Job Title information, one to fetch the FGD information (and only one of the two needs to return the Booking information). However, you then have to do some presentation work in your application code (which is where presentation work should be done, but that's a different discussion).

So, for the faint of heart, I recommend using two queries. For the brave, read on...


For the Brave

Update: The material down to TDQD — including the Testing is mildly erroneous.

First off, let me state: if that is what you're after, then it is relatively hard work to do, though it can be done. Secondly, it is a heap simpler with OLAP functions in the DBMS. With MySQL (and some other DBMS), you can use temporary tables to hold the intermediate results.

You join Booking and Job Title on Booking ID. You join Booking and FGD on Receipt No. Suppose we create two intermediate result sets:

SequencedJobTitles(Booking ID, Job_Seq_No)
SequencedReceipts(Receipt No, Rec_Seq_No)

where the job sequence number in the first goes from 1..N for each Booking ID, and the receipt sequence number goes from 1..M for each Receipt No.

Now we can write:

SELECT B.*, J.*, R.*
  FROM Booking AS B
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT J1.*, J2.Job_Seq_No
               FROM SequencedJobTitles AS J2
               JOIN JobTitle           AS J1 ON J2.BookingID = J1.BookingID
            ) AS J
    ON B.BookingID = J.BookingID
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT R1.*, R2.Rec_Seq_No
               FROM SequencedReceipts      AS R2
               JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1 ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
            ) AS R
 WHERE J.Job_Seq_No = R.Rec_Seq_No
   AND B.Receipt_No = 753263343
 ORDER BY B.BookingID, COALESCE(J2.Job_Seq_No, R2.Rec_Seq_No);

Yes, the use of * is lazy; I'd refine it to list the exact list of columns that I wanted in a production query. For debugging, it ensures you see all the data, which is probably helpful.

How to create the two intermediate result sets?

In the absence of OLAP functionality, you could generate the SequencedJobTitles with:

SELECT J1.BookingID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
  FROM JobTitle AS J1
  JOIN JobTitle AS J2
    ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
 WHERE J1.JobTitleID <= J2.JobTitleID
 GROUP BY J1.BookingID;

Similarly for the SequencedReceipts with:

SELECT R1.Receipt_No, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
  FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
  JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
    ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
 WHERE R1.ID <= R2.ID
 GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No;

These expressions use a self-join with a non-equijoin, which is moderately expensive. You'd probably want to get a restriction to just the relevant Booking ID or Receipt Numbers into the sub-queries if the tables are big. Note that you can test these sub-queries in isolation; this is a good idea for TDQD (Test Driven Query Design).

However, we can simply slot these subqueries into the main query developed before:

SELECT B.*, J.*, R.*
  FROM Booking AS B
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT J1.*, J2.Job_Seq_No
               FROM (SELECT J1.BookingID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
                      FROM JobTitle AS J1
                      JOIN JobTitle AS J2
                        ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
                     WHERE J1.JobTitleID <= J2.JobTitleID
                     GROUP BY J1.BookingID
                    ) AS J2
               JOIN JobTitle AS J1 ON J2.BookingID = J1.BookingID
            ) AS J
    ON B.BookingID = J.BookingID
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT R1.*, R2.Rec_Seq_No
               FROM (SELECT R1.Receipt_No, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
                      FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
                      JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
                        ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
                     WHERE R1.ID <= R2.ID
                     GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No
                    ) AS R2
               JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1 ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
            ) AS R
    ON J.Job_Seq_No = R.Rec_Seq_No
 WHERE B.Receipt_No = 753263343
 ORDER BY B.BookingID, COALESCE(J2.Job_Seq_No, R2.Rec_Seq_No);

Caution: untested SQL!

Update: This warning was not put there idly. I don't trust myself to write complex queries accurately first time, no matter how hard I try. And I'd not tried to produce the outline result I showed before (I've always used the two separate queries and combine the data in the presentation tool approach instead), so mistakes were, I suppose, inevitable.

TDQD — including the Testing

Real TDQD shows that the sequence queries are close, but not correct. Although I changed the <= conditions into >= conditions, that is more cosmetic than substantive. The correct queries are as follows:

SELECT J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
  FROM JobTitle AS J1
  JOIN JobTitle AS J2
    ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
 WHERE J1.JobTitleID >= J2.JobTitleID
 GROUP BY J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID;

SELECT R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
  FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
  JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
    ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
 WHERE R1.ID >= R2.ID
 GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID;

These two results can each be joined back with the corresponding table, but the join condition is different from what I originally wrote:

SELECT J4.*, J3.Job_Seq_No
  FROM (SELECT J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
          FROM JobTitle AS J1
          JOIN JobTitle AS J2
            ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
         WHERE J1.JobTitleID >= J2.JobTitleID
         GROUP BY J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID
        ) AS J3
  JOIN JobTitle AS J4
    ON J3.BookingID  = J4.BookingID
   AND J3.JobTitleID = J4.JobTitleID
 ORDER BY J4.BookingID, J3.Job_Seq_No;

SELECT R4.*, R3.Rec_Seq_No
  FROM (SELECT R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
          FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
          JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
            ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
         WHERE R1.ID >= R2.ID
         GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID
        ) AS R3
   JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R4
     ON R3.Receipt_No = R4.Receipt_No
    AND R3.ID         = R4.ID
  ORDER BY R4.Receipt_No, R3.Rec_Seq_No;

And then you can run this query:

SELECT B.*, J.*, R.*
  FROM Booking AS B
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT J4.*, J3.Job_Seq_No
               FROM (SELECT J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
                       FROM JobTitle AS J1
                       JOIN JobTitle AS J2
                         ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
                      WHERE J1.JobTitleID >= J2.JobTitleID
                      GROUP BY J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID
                     ) AS J3
               JOIN JobTitle AS J4
                 ON J3.BookingID  = J4.BookingID
                AND J3.JobTitleID = J4.JobTitleID
            ) AS J
    ON B.BookingID = J.BookingID
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT R4.*, R3.Rec_Seq_No
               FROM (SELECT R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
                       FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
                       JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
                         ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
                      WHERE R1.ID >= R2.ID
                      GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID
                     ) AS R3
                JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R4
                  ON R3.Receipt_No = R4.Receipt_No
                 AND R3.ID         = R4.ID
            ) AS R
    ON B.Receipt_No = R.Receipt_No
 WHERE B.Receipt_No = 753263343
   AND J.Job_Seq_No = R.Rec_Seq_No
 ORDER BY B.BookingID, NVL(J.Job_Seq_No, R.Rec_Seq_No);

Unfortunately, it produces just three rows on the sample data; it omits the last of the 4 receipt numbers. This is why I do TDQD; when I take short cuts, I find there are problems.

The structure of the last query needs to be such that the J and R sub-queries are joined using a FULL OUTER JOIN (in general), and therefore they need either the Receipt Number or Booking ID in common. I chose to add the Receipt Number to the JobTitle information; it would work fine with the Booking ID added to the First Graphics Debtors information; symmetry suggests doing both, but that might also be regarded as overkill.

SELECT B.Receipt_No, J4.*, J3.Job_Seq_No
  FROM (SELECT J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
          FROM JobTitle AS J1
          JOIN JobTitle AS J2
            ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
         WHERE J1.JobTitleID >= J2.JobTitleID
         GROUP BY J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID
        ) AS J3
  JOIN JobTitle AS J4
    ON J3.BookingID  = J4.BookingID
   AND J3.JobTitleID = J4.JobTitleID
  JOIN Booking  AS B
    ON B.BookingID = J4.BookingID
 ORDER BY J4.BookingID, J3.Job_Seq_No;

Then, combining the two sequenced lists with a FULL OUTER JOIN:

SELECT *
  FROM (SELECT B.Receipt_No, J4.*, J3.Job_Seq_No
          FROM (SELECT J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
                  FROM JobTitle AS J1
                  JOIN JobTitle AS J2
                    ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
                 WHERE J1.JobTitleID >= J2.JobTitleID
                 GROUP BY J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID
                ) AS J3
          JOIN JobTitle AS J4
            ON J3.BookingID  = J4.BookingID
           AND J3.JobTitleID = J4.JobTitleID
          JOIN Booking  AS B
            ON B.BookingID = J4.BookingID
       ) AS J
  FULL OUTER JOIN
       (SELECT R4.*, R3.Rec_Seq_No
          FROM (SELECT R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
                  FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
                  JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
                    ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
                 WHERE R1.ID >= R2.ID
                 GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID
                ) AS R3
           JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R4
             ON R3.Receipt_No = R4.Receipt_No
            AND R3.ID         = R4.ID
       ) AS R
    ON J.Receipt_No = R.Receipt_No AND J.Job_Seq_No = R.Rec_Seq_No
ORDER BY NVL(J.Receipt_No, R.Receipt_No), NVL(J.Job_Seq_No, R.Rec_Seq_No);

Final Sample Query

And finally embedding that into the main query gives (a very verbose version of) the desired result:

SELECT B.*, JR.*
  FROM Booking AS B
  JOIN (SELECT NVL(J.Receipt_No, R.Receipt_No) AS Rec_No,
               NVL(J.Job_Seq_No, R.Rec_Seq_No) AS Seq_No,
               J.*, R.*
          FROM (SELECT B.Receipt_No, J4.*, J3.Job_Seq_No
                  FROM (SELECT J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID, COUNT(*) AS Job_Seq_No
                          FROM JobTitle AS J1
                          JOIN JobTitle AS J2
                            ON J1.BookingID = J2.BookingID
                         WHERE J1.JobTitleID >= J2.JobTitleID
                         GROUP BY J1.BookingID, J1.JobTitleID
                        ) AS J3
                  JOIN JobTitle AS J4
                    ON J3.BookingID  = J4.BookingID
                   AND J3.JobTitleID = J4.JobTitleID
                  JOIN Booking  AS B
                    ON B.BookingID = J4.BookingID
               ) AS J
          FULL OUTER JOIN
               (SELECT R4.*, R3.Rec_Seq_No
                  FROM (SELECT R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID, COUNT(*) AS Rec_Seq_No
                          FROM First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1
                          JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R2
                            ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
                         WHERE R1.ID >= R2.ID
                         GROUP BY R1.Receipt_No, R1.ID
                        ) AS R3
                   JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R4
                     ON R3.Receipt_No = R4.Receipt_No
                    AND R3.ID         = R4.ID
               ) AS R
            ON J.Receipt_No = R.Receipt_No AND J.Job_Seq_No = R.Rec_Seq_No
       ) AS JR
    ON B.Receipt_No = JR.Rec_No
 WHERE B.Receipt_No = 753263343
 ORDER BY B.BookingID, Seq_No;

With a very much more selective column list like this:

SELECT B.BookingID    AS Booking,
       B.Receipt_No   AS Receipt,
       B.Client       AS Client,
       JR.JobTitleID  AS Title
       JR.JobTitle    AS JobTitle,
       JR.Old_Balance AS Old_Balance,
       JR.New_Balance AS New_Balance
  FROM Booking AS B
...

Final Sample Output

The result data I obtained from the sample data was:

booking   receipt    client  title  jobtitle            old_balance new_balance
208       753263343  Chaka   460    A3 Full Colour      152161      0
208       753263343  Chaka   461    Flex Banner         152161      137637
208       753263343  Chaka   462    A2 Single Colour    152161      150161
208       753263343  Chaka                              152161      151161

The only residual issue is whether MySQL support the FULL OUTER JOIN notation. If not, you can use a RIGHT OUTER JOIN on this sample data (where there are fewer rows in the Job Title information than in the FGD information).


Using OLAP functions

Update: This is based on the now known to be erroneous queries. Analagous changes must be made here to get it working as required.

With OLAP functions, I think you'd be able to create the sequenced result sets like this:

SELECT BookingID,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY BookingID ORDER BY JobTitleID) AS Job_Seq_No
  FROM JobTitle;

SELECT Receipt_No,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Receipt_No ORDER BY ID) AS Rec_Seq_No
  FROM First_Graphics_Debtors;

However, I'm much less confident of this part of the SQL. However, the resulting big query is simpler:

SELECT B.*, J.*, R.*
  FROM Booking AS B
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT J1.*, J2.Job_Seq_No
               FROM (SELECT BookingID,
                            ROW_NUMBER()
                            OVER (PARTITION BY BookingID ORDER BY JobTitleID)
                            AS Job_Seq_No
                       FROM JobTitle
                    ) AS J2
               JOIN JobTitle AS J1 ON J2.BookingID = J1.BookingID
            ) AS J
    ON B.BookingID = J.BookingID
  LEFT JOIN (SELECT R1.*, R2.Rec_Seq_No
               FROM (SELECT Receipt_No,
                            ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Receipt_No ORDER BY ID)
                            AS Rec_Seq_No
                       FROM First_Graphics_Debtors
                    ) AS R2
               JOIN First_Graphics_Debtors AS R1 ON R1.Receipt_No = R2.Receipt_No
            ) AS R
 WHERE J.Job_Seq_No = R.Rec_Seq_No
   AND B.Receipt_No = 753263343
 ORDER BY B.BookingID, COALESCE(J2.Job_Seq_No, R2.Rec_Seq_No);

Caution: more untested SQL!

share|improve this answer
    
Can you recommend a good MySQL book for a beginner? Thanks. – sality May 19 '12 at 7:10
    
No, but mainly because I haven't done a thorough exploration of the available books. I have an O'Reilly book on it (from a few years ago, now); it's OK, but I'm not sure I'd want to learn SQL Programming from it. It's good for MySQL; it's not so good for SQL. And, at least the way I did it, that query above is a brute, as you can see from the fact that it took me two attempts to get it right. Obviously, a large part of the problem is conceptual; it is an unusual arrangement for the data (but one I've often thought of simulating); I'm not sure the effort of simulating is worth the pain. – Jonathan Leffler May 19 '12 at 7:51
    
'SQL Anti-Patterns' by Bill Karwin is a pretty good book, but it is not a 'learn SQL' book. My problem is I learned SQL 25+ years ago, so I've had lots of time for most of it to sink in. Date's "Introduction to Database Systems" is fairly comprehensive, but covers far more than just SQL. His 'SQL and Relational Theory: How to Write Accurate SQL Code' is pretty good, too. I'm reading his new book, 'Database Design and Relational Theory: Normal Forms and All That Jazz', but it is about database design more than SQL query writing. Maybe some of the Joe Celko corpus would help. – Jonathan Leffler May 19 '12 at 8:00
    
It always scares me when I come up with a query as complex as the one in my answer. I live in hope that someone will come up with a simpler answer, but 'hope' and 'expectation' are rather different. – Jonathan Leffler May 19 '12 at 8:02

I'm fairly certain that your problem is because of your GROUP BY clause. Not sure what your aim was in using that, but try without it. If you get duplicate rows, try using SELECT DISTINCT. If your aim was to order the results based on that column, then use ORDER BY.

Also, specifying the receipt_no twice in the WHERE clause is redundant. Those two tables are already joined by that column, so filtering it in one table is all you need to do. And the backticks aren't really necessary except for some special exceptions, like spaces or commas in the column name, or columns named the same as reserved words (may be a few others as well). The only column of yours that looks like it needs backticks is the date column, but even excluding them on that column, you should still be fine. I just find that backticks everywhere make the query longer and harder to read. They don't hurt anything by being there, so you can leave them if that's your preference, but personally, I'm not a fan.

I rewrote your query with my modifications mentioned above, plus I gave the tables aliases to further shorten it. This doesn't improve performance or anything, just makes it easier to read IMO:

SELECT DISTINCT
    b.receipt_no, client, operator, discount, total_amount,
    amount_paid, balance, `date`, jobtitle, quantity,
    amount, date_paid, old_balance, debtor_amount_paid, new_balance
FROM
    booking b
    INNER JOIN jobtitle jt ON jt.bookingID = b.bookingID
    INNER JOIN first_graphics_debtors fgd ON fgd.receipt_no = b.receipt_no
WHERE
    b.receipt_no = '753263343'
ORDER BY
    jt.quantity
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for using table aliases and removing backticks. The problem is caused by GROUP BY; I'm not sure DISTINCT is the solution, though. I believe your query will return 12 rows. One row from Booking is joined with each of three rows from Job Title, and those three are all joined with 4 rows from First Graphics Debtors. – Jonathan Leffler May 18 '12 at 14:01
    
@JonathanLeffler: I see what you mean. I think that to get the desired output, there would have to be some kind of join condition between the jobtitle table and the first_graphics_debtors table. Otherwise I don't see how to match those records up. – Travesty3 May 18 '12 at 14:27
    
The backticks were generated by codeigniter profiler. I don't know how to use aliases in active record even though i love to use them. I'm new to my MySQL and i think @JonathanLeffler have a clearer picture of the query output. I'm not sure the problem was caused by GROUP BY, because i have tried all sorts of combination. After proper thought and reviewing how join works, i discovered that it will be impossible to get the desired result in a single select statement. I decided to use two separate queries and the output was fine. Thank you all for your input and advice. – sality May 18 '12 at 18:45
    
Machine-generated SQL often foregoes the simplicity that people writing SQL by hand expect. Machine-generating meaningful aliases is not entirely trivial, and using (say) x1, x2, ... is less helpful. And machines don't mind typing the table name out over, and over, and over again. People do. I do. The backticks are likewise something that machines do easily and people don't. – Jonathan Leffler May 18 '12 at 19:26

You might want to use FULL JOIN to align those joined rows, but since there's no FULL JOIN on MySQL, you have to contend with UNION:

Code compacted to avoid scrollbars:

select bx.*, null as sepy, booking_particulars.*
from booking bx 
join (
  select same_n, 
     max(Receipt_No) as Receipt_No, max(Quantity) as Quantity,  
     max(Amount) as Amount, 
     null as sepx, -- separator      
     max(Date_Paid) as Date_Paid, max(Old_Balance) as Old_Balance, 
     max(Debtor_Amount_Paid) as Debtor_Amount_Paid, 
     max(New_Balance) as New_Balance
  from (
    select *                
    from (
      select b.Receipt_No, j.Quantity, j.Amount,           
        null as Date_Paid, null as Old_Balance, null as Debtor_Amount_Paid, 
        null as New_Balance, @j_rn := @j_rn + 1 as same_n            
      from (booking b, (select @j_rn := 0) as vars) 
      join jobtitle j ON j.bookingID = b.bookingID
      where b.receipt_no =  '753263343' 
      order by j.JobTitleId
    ) as jx
    union all
    select * from (
      select f.Receipt_No, null as Quantity, null as Amount,             
        f.Date_Paid, f.Old_Balance, f.Debtor_Amount_Paid, 
        f.New_Balance, @f_rn := @f_rn + 1 as same_n          
      from (first_graphics_debtors f, (select @f_rn := 0) as vars)
      where f.receipt_no = '753263343' 
      order by f.id
    ) as fx
  ) as z
  group by same_n order by same_n
) as booking_particulars on booking_particulars.receipt_no = bx.receipt_no

Output:

| BOOKINGID | RECEIPT_NO | CLIENT | OPERATOR | DISCOUNT | TOTAL_AMOUNT | AMOUNT_PAID | BALANCE |                       DATE |   SEPY | SAME_N | QUANTITY | AMOUNT |   SEPX |                  DATE_PAID | OLD_BALANCE | DEBTOR_AMOUNT_PAID | NEW_BALANCE |
|-----------|------------|--------|----------|----------|--------------|-------------|---------|----------------------------|--------|--------|----------|--------|--------|----------------------------|-------------|--------------------|-------------|
|       208 |  753263343 |  Chaka |  Stephen |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 | (null) |      1 |       10 |   4334 | (null) | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 |      152161 |             152161 |           0 |
|       208 |  753263343 |  Chaka |  Stephen |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 | (null) |      2 |       20 |   2930 | (null) | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 |      152161 |              14524 |      137637 |
|       208 |  753263343 |  Chaka |  Stephen |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 | (null) |      3 |      199 |    650 | (null) | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 |      152161 |               2000 |      150161 |
|       208 |  753263343 |  Chaka |  Stephen |       10 |       231290 |       56000 |  152161 | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 | (null) |      4 |   (null) | (null) | (null) | May, 15 2012 08:00:00-0700 |      152161 |               1000 |      151161 |

Live test and query progression here: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/d8d3b/45

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I was up with something i knew little about. Thanks – sality May 19 '12 at 7:12
    
You're welcome. Just a question, how is this not the answer, or at least one of the answers? ;-) Thanks – Michael Buen May 19 '12 at 8:08

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