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Considering class A, I would like to limit its creation to new. That is

A* a = new A; // Would be allowed.
A a;  // Would not be allowed.

How could this be accomplished?

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1  
It is possible in a round about way, but why do you need that? –  juanchopanza May 18 '12 at 11:46
    
It would be a really really bad idea. You'd be creating a class which can only be used from really bad code. Unless you're trying to ensure the presence of bugs in your code, don't do it –  jalf May 18 '12 at 11:49
    
@jalf: I agree with the sentiment, but I think your claim is a bit broad. :) –  John Dibling May 18 '12 at 13:07
    
@jalf: It's very useful in embedded work. If you have written a particularly heavyweight class you can prevent other developers from blowing the stack by enforcing the creation of any instances on the heap. –  Ant May 18 '12 at 13:39
    
@Ant: and you also prevent them from putting it in (heap-allocated) classes, or in a vector, for example. In other words, it's very useful if you're working with incompetents. but it also forces any competent developers you might have to write terrible code. –  jalf May 18 '12 at 13:59
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7 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could make the constructor private and provide a static factory method that returns a dynamically allocated instance:

class A
{
public:
    static A* new_instance() { return new A(); }
private:
    A() {}
};

Instead of returning a raw pointer, consider returning a smart pointer instead:

class A
{
public:
    static std::shared_ptr<A> new_instance()
    {
        return std::make_shared<A>();
    }
private:
    A() {}
};
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2  
Consider returning a unique_ptr instead. That should be the "default" smart pointer. shared_ptrs can be constructed from unique_ptrs easily if clients want it. If they don't want it, they don't have to pay for it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 18 '12 at 11:54
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes, thanks. I have not yet used the unique_ptr so don't have enough knowledge on its behaviour. –  hmjd May 18 '12 at 12:03
    
concering your example, the unique_ptr equivalent is almost the same, except there is no make_unique, so you return unique_ptr<A>. –  juanchopanza May 18 '12 at 12:12
    
@juanchopanza, unique_ptr is not copyable so is move semantics used? I am aware of RVO but am not sure if it is always guaranteed. –  hmjd May 18 '12 at 12:14
    
Good point. My understanding is that it is moved, since it is an unnamed temporary with a move constructor and move assignment operator. I haven't fully checked that though. –  juanchopanza May 18 '12 at 12:18
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One option is to make the constructor(s) private, and use a static helper function:

class A {
private:
    A() {}          // Default constructor
    A(const A &a);  // Copy constructor

public:
    static A *create() { return new A; }
};

...

A a;                // Won't compile
A *p = A::create(); // Fine

Although you should strongly consider returning a smart pointer rather than a raw pointer.

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Yes, you can do so using the factory pattern.

class A
{
    A() {}  //private by default
    friend struct AFactory;
};
struct AFactory
{
    static A* newA() { return new A; }
};

or a similar static member function.

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I assume you are trying to control what a client can do with your class. The answers here make use of slightly arcane techniques. A common way of segregating systems is to use interfaces.

You could make A abstract:

class A
{
public:
    virtual void doSomething() = 0;
    virtual ~A() {}
};

And make at least one implementation:

class A_impl : public A
{
public:
    virtual void doSomething()
    {
         // behaviour
    }
};

Then return an instance of A_impl to the client using a (smart)pointer as the other answers suggest.

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This is actually very simple. Make your destructor private. Objects with private destructors cannot be created on the stack, so the only way to create them is via a call to "new". You'll need to provide another mechanism for deleting the object, such as a "delete()" method that calls "delete self".

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Can you not just do:

A* a;

? That is just declaring a pointer to an A object. It hasn't been initialised though so you should probably do

A* a = NULL;

That is a pointer to an object of type A but points to a known (non)value.

EDIT: Perhaps I'm not grasping the full question given the complexity of the other answers here.

EDIT2: Is he asking if you can prevent creation of object on the stack and only allow heap created objects and access via pointers? If that is the case my vote goes to a factory pattern.

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Just make the default constructor of class A as private.

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Then how can you call new A? Just this isn't enough. –  Luchian Grigore May 18 '12 at 12:08
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