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I have this Linq query that (correctly) supplies met static data from a User. I now manually perform the 'Include' of the User table. What I'm look for is that the result of this query actually becomes the collection of the parent User object.

If i select multiple user names (s.User.Name) instead of a single i use now, i would only get returned the same number of User objects as usernames i search for with their Statistics (User.Statistics) collection filled with the data like returned by the query below.

var statistics =    (( 
        from s in db.Statistics
        where s.User.ScreenName == screenName && 
              s.CreateDate > EntityFunctions.AddDays(DateTime.Now, days)
        group s by EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(s.CreateDate) into dg

        let maxDate = dg.Max(x => x.CreateDate)
        from s2 in db.Statistics
        where s2.User.ScreenName == screenName && 
              s2.CreateDate == maxDate
        orderby s2.CreateDate
        select s2) as ObjectQuery<Statistic>).Include("User").ToList();

Update 18-05-2012 15:41

Simply returning s2.User won't work as it will return the user as many times as there are rows returned from statistic table, I would only like to get 1 user object and have it's statistics collection (User.Statistics) filled with the result of the query.

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2 Answers 2

return the user in your select clause:

var users=
    ( 
    from s in db.Statistics
    where s.User.ScreenName == screenName && 
          s.CreateDate > EntityFunctions.AddDays(DateTime.Now, days)
    group s by EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(s.CreateDate) into dg

    let maxDate = dg.Max(x => x.CreateDate)
    from s2 in db.Statistics
    where s2.User.ScreenName == screenName && 
          s2.CreateDate == maxDate
    orderby s2.CreateDate
    select s2.User.User       // <--------
    ).ToList();

to get a unique list of users add .Distinct(). If that doesn't work here's a guess (without knowing your object model) on how to get the users:

 var allusernames=
    ( 
    from s in db.Statistics
    where s.User.ScreenName == screenName && 
          s.CreateDate > EntityFunctions.AddDays(DateTime.Now, days)
    group s by EntityFunctions.TruncateTime(s.CreateDate) into dg

    let maxDate = dg.Max(x => x.CreateDate)
    from s2 in db.Statistics
    where s2.User.ScreenName == screenName && 
          s2.CreateDate == maxDate
    orderby s2.CreateDate
    select s2.User.UserName       // <--------
    ).ToList();

var distinct users =
    (
        from u in users
        where allusernames.Contains(u.UserName)
        select u
    ).ToList();
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This does not work as a simply the x number of the same User returned for each corresponding statistic entry. I would like to get 1 user (as i only query for 1 user here) and the Statistic collection of the User filled (User.Statistics) with the result of the query. –  Frank May 18 '12 at 13:40
    
Without knowing your data model I can;t give you a query that will return exactly one user. See updated answer for a few guesses. –  D Stanley May 18 '12 at 13:44

You want a query of Users, with the Statistics property only filled with the data you want, instead of the data in the database.

If you write a standard "include query" of users, you'll get all of the Statistics data, which you can then filter locally. In this case, more data may be loaded than you actually desire.

from u in db.Users.Include("Statistics")
where u.ScreenName == theScreenName
select u;

You could also write a query that only loads the statistics you want in the result type. In this case, the statistics property of the User instances will not be populated.

from u in db.Users
where u.ScreenName == theScreenName
let stats = u.Statistics.Where(...)
select new {User = u, Stats = stats.ToList()};

There is no way to get what you are asking for in LinqToEntities (User.Statistics partially populated). In LinqToSql - we would use DataLoadOptions.AssociateWith to do that job.

Once again, LinqToSql wins over EF.

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