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Take the sample ruby code, how to rewrite/indent it so the following ruby code to make it more readable & make sure it fits in one line i.e 80-90chars?

%w(survey survey_section question_group question dependency dependency_condition answer answer_type answer_validity validation validation_condition validation_prefix validation_precludes error error_type error_level error_code style style_info style_override user user_model_name user_type).each {|m| require m }

Reading it is painful as I have long arrays like this present all over the codebase. it requires LOT of horizontal scrolling & I don't like that

Any way I can improve this?

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1  
This sort of question would do better on codereview.stackexchange.com –  the Tin Man May 23 '12 at 6:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The %w splits on whitespace, so you can insert newlines whenever you want and get the same result:

dependencies = %w(survey survey_section question_group question 
  dependency dependency_condition answer answer_type answer_validity 
  validation validation_condition validation_prefix 
  validation_precludes error error_type error_level error_code 
  style style_info style_override user user_model_name user_type)

dependencies.each {|m| require m }
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Similar to how @derekerdmann did it, I might use:

%w[
  survey               survey_section       question_group       question
  dependency           dependency_condition answer               answer_type
  answer_validity      validation           validation_condition validation_prefix
  validation_precludes error                error_type           error_level       error_code
  style                style_info           style_override       user
  user_model_name      user_type
].each { |m| require m }

Wrapping and aligning like that is simple in Vim, using the Align plugin.

But, more likely, I'd put all the requires into a separate file and require it, much like using an include file in C to pull in a bunch of other include files. In this case, they're still being loaded, but they're out of sight. So, in a requirements.rb file I'd have:

require 'answer'
require 'answer_type'
require 'answer_validity'
require 'dependency'
require 'dependency_condition'
require 'error'
require 'error_code'
require 'error_level'
require 'error_type'
require 'question'
require 'question_group'
require 'style'
require 'style_info'
require 'style_override'
require 'survey'
require 'survey_section'
require 'user'
require 'user_model_name'
require 'user_type'
require 'validation'
require 'validation_condition'
require 'validation_precludes'
require 'validation_prefix'

And in my main code file I'd have require_relative './requirements'.

Alternately, I'd split the lists into a more manageable grouping, such as alphabetically:

%w[ answer answer_type answer_validity ].each { |r| require r }
%w[ dependency dependency_condition ].each { |r| require r }
%w[ error error_code error_level error_type ].each { |r| require r }
%w[ question question_group ].each { |r| require r }
%w[ style style_info style_override survey survey_section ].each { |r| require r }
%w[ user user_model_name user_type ].each { |r| require r }
%w[ validation validation_condition validation_precludes validation_prefix ].each { |r| require r }

It isn't as DRY as I'd like, but it's more organized and readable.

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I like your example with all the require statements. That is actually not a DRY violation at all, and it is not just easy to read: it's easy to change. If you want to add error_location, for example, the third line of your last example would probably get too long and you'd have to reorganize, whereas the earlier example you can just add a line. It's also much easier to scan because you only have to move along one axis. –  David Chelimsky Jun 19 '12 at 3:48
    
Good reasons for liking the middle example. Probably splitting the list as the first letter changes, by putting a blank line above and below, would help even more. –  the Tin Man Jun 20 '12 at 0:14

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