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Possible Duplicate:
Detecting an undefined object property in JavaScript
javascript undefined compare

How we can put a check for undefined like:

function A(val){
  if(val == undefined) 
    //do this
  else
   //do this
}
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marked as duplicate by Adriano Repetti, Quentin, Blazemonger, Jack, tim_yates May 18 '12 at 14:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 86 down vote accepted

JQuery library was developed specifically to simplify and to unify certain JavaScript functionality.

However if you need to check a variable against undefined value, there is no need to invent any special method, since JavaScript has a typeof operator, which is simple, fast and cross-platform:

if (typeof value === "undefined") {
    // ...
}

It returns a string indicating the type of the variable or other unevaluated operand. The main advantage of this method, compared to if (value === undefined) { ... }, is that typeof will never raise an exception in case if variable value does not exist.

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It doesn't work with jquery –  Hast Nov 16 '12 at 13:46
    
It works with jQuery 1.7.2.min for me. –  Radek Feb 14 '13 at 2:14
    
this is plain javascript which is cool, but he asked about jquery option... –  ncubica May 31 '13 at 16:17
1  
@nahum jQuery is a JavaScript library. This is not a different programming language. –  VisioN May 31 '13 at 17:47
4  
lol omg are you really commenting this?? I know is the same man. But I guess he want to know if exist some kind of method in jQuery like $.isUndefined(Object); and return the value true or false. typeof is just javascript without any framework. –  ncubica May 31 '13 at 17:49

In this case you can use a === undefined comparison: if(val === undefined)

This works because val always exists (it's a function argument).

If you wanted to test an arbitrary variable that is not an argument, i.e. might not be defined at all, you'd have to use if(typeof val === 'undefined') to avoid an exception in case val didn't exist.

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Note that typeof always returns a string, and doesn't generate an error if the variable doesn't exist at all.

function A(val){
  if(typeof(val)  === "undefined") 
    //do this
  else
   //do this
}
share|improve this answer
1  
For string comparison, I think we need to use === instead of == –  Sreeram May 18 '12 at 13:20
    
@Sreeram they both do comparison, just in different ways...this will work fine –  RGB May 18 '12 at 13:22

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