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I've got the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int i = 0;
    (i+=10)+=10;
    printf("i = %d\n", i);
    return 0;
}

If I try to compile it as a C source using gcc I get an error:

error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment

But if I compile it as a C++ source using g++ I get no error and when i run the executable:

i = 20

Why the different behaviour?

share|improve this question
74  
Different language, different syntax rules?. Personally, I would reject that code in code-review. –  Max May 18 '12 at 13:53
6  
Avoid code like this imo... Unclear for everyone. –  allaire May 18 '12 at 13:54
    
Undoubtfully, the code isn't clean and should be avoid in "real" development. But nevertheless, I observe the same behavior and would like to know reasons for it. –  ulidtko May 18 '12 at 13:56
6  
This is NOT a code excerpt from a real piece of software. This is just a kink I've stumbled upon accidentally. –  Svetlin Mladenov May 18 '12 at 13:58
3  
@JohnDibling I think the upvote is specifically the (i += 10) += 10 i don't know what language that is legitimate code in and the fact that he says C++ actually compiles it intrigues me. –  Tony318 May 18 '12 at 19:18
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2 Answers 2

up vote 120 down vote accepted

Semantics of the add-assign operators is different in C and C++:

C99 standard, 6.5.16, part 3:

An assignment operator stores a value in the object designated by the left operand. An assignment expression has the value of the left operand after the assignment, but is not an lvalue.

In C++ 5.17.1:

The assignment operator (=) and the compound assignment operators all group right-to-left. All require a modifiable lvalue as their left operand and return an lvalue with the type and value of the left operand after the assignment has taken place.

EDIT : The behavior of (i+=10)+=10 in C++ is undefined in C++98, but well defined in C++11. See this answer to the question by aix for the relevant portions of the standards.

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11  
+1 for reporting the Standard. –  akappa May 18 '12 at 13:59
    
Correct. One returns the result value, and one returns the variable (address) –  texasbruce May 18 '12 at 14:00
5  
Important: Note that (i+=10)+=10 is undefined behavior in C++, see @aix answer. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 18 '12 at 15:05
4  
@dasblinkenlight: No, he meant undefined. In C++03 and earlier, modifying the lvalue result of an expression behaves unpredictably in all compilers due to the lack of intervening sequence point. If it were unspecified, it would behave predictably but differently on different compilers. –  Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ May 18 '12 at 15:50
2  
It would have been useful in a setting like int f(int &y); f(x += 10); - passing a reference to the modified variable into a function. –  Novelocrat May 18 '12 at 21:00
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In addition to being invalid C code, the line

(i+=10)+=10;

would result in undefined behaviour in both C and C++03 because it would modify i twice between sequence points.

As to why it's allowed to compile in C++:

[C++N3242 5.17.1] The assignment operator (=) and the compound assignment operators all group right-to-left. All require a modifiable lvalue as their left operand and return an lvalue referring to the left operand.

The same paragraph goes on to say that

In all cases, the assignment is sequenced after the value computation of the right and left operands, and before the value computation of the assignment expression.

This suggests that in C++11, the expression no longer has undefined behaviour.

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3  
Well, it’s certainly UB because of the sequence points. It’s also invalid code in C (but not C++) but that’s unrelated to sequence points, and should be caught by the compiler. –  Konrad Rudolph May 18 '12 at 13:57
2  
@KonradRudolph: no, the compiler is not obliged to catch undefined behavior, as opposed to ill-formed code. The "should be caught by the compiler" part is where we disagree. –  Fanael May 18 '12 at 14:03
2  
Sequence points don't exist in C++11, so the actual reason for the UB is that there are two modifications to i that are unsequenced. –  Mankarse May 18 '12 at 14:11
4  
It's false that this is undefined behavior. If the assignment weren't sequence before the value computation of the assignment expression then i = j+=1 would result in an indeterminate value. From the same paragraph you quote "In all cases, the assignment is sequenced after the value computation of the right and left operands, and before the value computation of the assignment expression." Therefore (i+=10)+=10 is well defined to do i += 10; i += 10;. On the other hand (i+=10)+=(i+=10) is UB. –  bames53 May 18 '12 at 14:39
2  
Since I saw that there was some disagreement on this between the commenters, I've posted this as a separate question: stackoverflow.com/questions/10655290/… –  NPE May 18 '12 at 15:20
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