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I need an array of user structs.

struct user {
    char *username;
};  

struct user users[10]; //Array of user structs

int main(int argc, char **args) {
    int initUsersArray();        
    char *username = "Max";
    addToUsersArrry(username);

}



int addToUsersArrry(username) {
int i;
i = 0;
struct user tmp;    
for(i;i<10;i++) {
    if(users[i] != NULL) 
        if(strcmp(*users[i].username,username)==0)
            return -1;
}
i = 0;
for(i;i<10;i++) {
    if(users[i] = NULL) { 
        users[i]=tmp;
        users[i].username=username;
        return 1;
    }   

}   

}

int initUsersArray() {  
int i;
i=0;
struct user tmp;

for(i;i<10;i++) {
    users[i] = (struct user*) calloc(1,sizeof(tmp));
}
}

My first question is, if it is the right way to init the users array with NULL like i did. The second problem is, that *users[i].username and other parts of code where want to get/set the user at a specific position, dont work. Regards

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you copied the code correctly? –  David Heffernan May 18 '12 at 14:07
    
I have updated one line, but rest of code is copied correcty. I am new to c, so dont be suprised if i wrote "strange" code. –  user1324258 May 18 '12 at 14:16
    
You should use the empty string or '\0' instead of NULL, i.e. "". –  Thor May 18 '12 at 14:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here, I fixed it for you. And don't forget to diff and learn something. Don't just c/p it.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct user {
    char *username;
} user;

user *users; //Array of user structs

int addToUsersArray(char *username) {
int i = 0;

for(; i<10; i++) {
    if(users[i].username=='\0') {
        users[i].username = username;
    return 1;
    } else if(strcmp(users[i].username, username) == 0)
    return -1;
}
return -1;
}

void initUsersArray() {  
    users = (user*) calloc(10, sizeof(user)); //10 of them
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    initUsersArray();        
        char *username = "Max";
        addToUsersArray(username);
    username = "Ma1x";
    addToUsersArray(username);
    printf("%s\n",users[0].username);
    printf("%s\n",users[1].username); 
    return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for fixing. Where is the difference in using "." instead of "->"? –  user1324258 May 18 '12 at 14:34
    
It's just a shorthand (Syntactic sugar) for *(pointerToSomething).field –  iccthedral May 18 '12 at 14:37
    
Ah okey, but does "." has another meaning? And look at your code, i tried to check if username already exists and getting a segmentationfault. –  user1324258 May 18 '12 at 14:41
    
See my updated answer. I encourage you to go step-by-step through this code and google everything unfamiliar. –  iccthedral May 18 '12 at 14:58
    
unfamiliar to me was only that if i compare a string with a empty string, that i get a segmentation fault. Thank you very much (hvala ti puno ;)) –  user1324258 May 18 '12 at 15:03

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