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I have a dictionary in python

d = {tags[0]: value, tags[1]: value, tags[2]: value, tags[3]: value, tags[4]: value}

imagine that this dict is 10 times bigger, it has 50 keys and 50 values. Duplicates can be found in this tags but even then values are essential. How can I simply trimm it to recive new dict without duplicates of keys but with summ of values instead?

d = {'cat': 5, 'dog': 9, 'cat': 4, 'parrot': 6, 'cat': 6}

result

d = {'cat': 15, 'dog': 9, 'parrot': 6}

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3  
You do not have that dictionary, all keys are unique. –  Niek de Klein May 18 '12 at 14:30
    
You can't have duplicates in a python dictionary –  Andy May 18 '12 at 14:31
3  
As a side note: it's good practice not naming your dict dict since you are then shadowing the builtin name. –  ChristopheD May 18 '12 at 14:39
    
You should consider changing the Question name as dictionaries cannot have duplicate keys in the first place –  Paul Seeb May 18 '12 at 14:48

7 Answers 7

I'd like to improve Paul Seeb's answer:

tps = [('cat',5),('dog',9),('cat',4),('parrot',6),('cat',6)]
result = {}
for k, v in tps:
  result[k] = result.get(k, 0) + v
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This is excellent actually. What I was thinking but couldn't figure out :) –  Paul Seeb May 18 '12 at 14:43
1  
track = [] for key, value in neop1: track.append(key) result[key] = ( result.get(key,0) + float(value) ) / track.count(key) #this would get you the average –  chimpsarehungry Feb 24 '14 at 17:34

Perhapse what you really want is a tuple of key-value pairs.

[('dog',1), ('cat',2), ('cat',3)]
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tps = [('cat',5),('dog',9),('cat',4),('parrot',6),('cat',6)]

from collections import defaultdict

dicto = defaultdict(int)

for k,v in tps:
    dicto[k] += v

Result:

>>> dicto
defaultdict(<type 'int'>, {'dog': 9, 'parrot': 6, 'cat': 15})
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Instead of just doing dict of those things (can't have multiples of same key in a dict) I assume you can have them in a list of tuple pairs. Then it is just as easy as

tps = [('cat',5),('dog',9),('cat',4),('parrot',6),('cat',6)]
result = {}
for k,v in tps:
    try:
        result[k] += v
    except KeyError:
        result[k] = v

>>> result
{'dog': 9, 'parrot': 6, 'cat': 15}

changed mine to more explicit try-except handling. Alfe's is very concise though

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1  
Why not use collections.defaultdict ? –  Akavall May 18 '12 at 14:48
1  
Why would you though? I feel that making the import for something as simple as this is over complicating the solution. Alfe's answer is the obvious choice here. Mine does the same as his its just more explicit in meaning –  Paul Seeb May 18 '12 at 14:51
    
Just a matter of taste, I guess. I would use defaultdict though. I prefer the readability of it. Also it is designed to handle cases like that. –  Akavall May 18 '12 at 14:58

This option serves but is done with a list, or best can provide insight

data = []
        for i, j in query.iteritems():
            data.append(int(j))    
        try:
            data.sort()
        except TypeError:
            del data
        data_array = []
        for x in data:
            if x not in data_array:
                data_array.append(x)  
        return data_array
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I'm not sure what you're trying to achieve, but the Counter class might be helpful for what you're trying to do: http://docs.python.org/dev/library/collections.html#collections.Counter

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If I understand correctly your question that you want to get rid of duplicate key data, use update function of dictionary while creating the dictionary. it will overwrite the data if the key is duplicate.

tps = [('cat',5),('dog',9),('cat',4),('parrot',6),('cat',6)]
result = {}
for k, v in tps:
    result.update({k:v})
for k in result:
    print "%s: %s" % (k, result[k]) 

Output will look like: dog: 9 parrot: 6 cat: 6

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