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Short Version:

I want to create a local branch (B) from a local branch (A) and make it track the same remote branch that (A) is tracking. How could I do that in one command? Is there any way I could set this behavior as default?

Full Explanation:

I've recently converted from using git-svn to "pure" git. There's an aspect of my workflow that has been really frustrating, and I'm trying to figure out a way to restore that workflow. Here is how it was with git-svn:

  • Create a new local branch (A) that tracks a remote branch (X)
  • Do some work, make some local commits.
  • git svn rebase -- A is rebased up to the HEAD of X
  • Do some work, make some local commits.
  • Have an offshoot idea, make a new local branch (B) from (A)
  • Do some work, make some local commits.
  • git svn rebase -- B is rebased up to the HEAD of X
  • etc.

In the pure git world, the problem I'm having is that while (A) tracks the remote branch, (B) does not inherit that. I'm aware that I can explicitly set this, by doing git branch --set-upstream (B) (X). What I am looking for is a way for this tracking behavior to be inherited automatically, so I don't have to remember to do this, and then get all frustrated when my git pull --rebase doesn't work on (B).

I realize that the "problem" with this is that it can lose the heritage of (B) having been made from (A). I just don't care about that.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Too much context, why do people likes to turn simple questions into complex ones?. I probably can ask it in one sentence. "How can i make my local branch permanently track a remote branch?" – KurzedMetal May 18 '12 at 14:44
    
Except that "How can i make my local branch permanently track a remote branch?" is explicitly NOT what I asked. – ipmcc May 18 '12 at 15:15
    
"I want to create a branch B from a local branch A and make it track the same remote branch that A is tracking. How could i do that in one command? Is there any way i could set this behavior as default?". Better? – KurzedMetal May 18 '12 at 15:56
    
Edited. FWIW, the arguably verbose explanation preemptively deflects the torrent of "Why in the world would you want to do that?"/"What are you really trying to do here?" responses by explaining what I'm really trying to do, and specifically why I want to do it. – ipmcc May 18 '12 at 17:10

You're trying to apply a centralized workflow to a distributed system. You need to think about doing things locally, not centrally. The shared (central) repository is simply the place where you put stuff you want to share with others, or you retrieve the stuff they want to share.

Here's essentially what you're asking for. However, I don't think it's the best workflow. See below for a modified version.

Create a new local branch (A) that tracks a remote branch (X)
   git clone <url> my_repo
Do some work, make some local commits.
   work, work work
   git add .
   git commit -m "commit of work"

A is rebased up to the HEAD of X.  We're operating on the same branch 
we want to rebase from the remote, so we can do it all with one command in 
this case.
   git pull --rebase

Do some work, make some local commits.
   work, work work
   git add .
   git commit -m "commit of work"

Have an offshoot idea, make a new local branch (B) from (A)
  git checkout -b idea

Do some work, make some local commits.
   work, work work
   git add .
   git commit -m "commit of work"

B is rebased up to the HEAD of X

   git rebase origin master

But....that whole workflow revolves around the remote as the "source of truth." The more git-way of doing it, IMHO is to think of your local as the source of truth, and just update it with shared content from the central repository. It's the same thing, just approaching it from a different angle.

Here's how I'd do your workflow:

Create a new local branch (A) that tracks a remote branch (X) git clone my_repo Do some work, make some local commits. work, work work git add . git commit -m "commit of work"

A is rebased up to the HEAD of X.  We use two commands here, but doing
it this way makes it easy for me to view the differences before 
doing the rebase, if I choose.
   git fetch
   git rebase origin/master

Do some work, make some local commits.
   work, work work
   git add .
   git commit -m "commit of work"

Have an offshoot idea, make a new local branch (B) from (A)
  git checkout -b idea

Do some work, make some local commits.
   work, work work
   git add .
   git commit -m "commit of work"

B is rebased up to the HEAD of X

   git fetch
   git rebase origin/master

Of course both of the scenarios depend upon the fact you didn't' do additional work on your local master branch before rebasing origin/master into your idea branch. If you did, you wouldn't have the commits you did on master locally, and it'd be more effective to do:

git fetch
git checkout master
git rebase origin/master  --(make sure master is up-to-date locally)
git checkout idea
git rebase master (apply idea on top of the updated local master)
share|improve this answer
    
The team I'm on uses git with a centralized workflow. Needing to get up to date with stuff that others have pushed to the "shared" repo happens multiple times daily. Your suggestion: git rebase origin/master works, but it requires that I know & type "origin/master" which is precisely what I don't want to do. I want branch (B) to be a tracking branch of the same remote that (A) is tracking. I have branch.autosetuprebase set to yes, so in the case where the branch is tracking, I just type git pull and I'm good to go. My question is about ensuring that all branches are tracking by default. – ipmcc May 18 '12 at 17:05
    
If you don't want to know or type "origin/master" then you're only hurting yourself in my opinion. If you're going to use git just like SVN, you might as well go back to SVN since that's what makes your team comfortable. The power of git is understanding concepts like origin/master and how you can utilize it. Because of the way git does things, you can do more complex operations and do so safely. But if you don't want to know any of that, there's not much point - might as will stick with subversion. – wadesworld May 18 '12 at 17:21
    
But to answer your specific question, I don't think there's a way to have git automatically setup tracking branches that point to the remote branch from which the local branch was created before the new branch was created. Typically tracking branches point to an identical branch on the remote. If you want them to point to something different, you're going to have to tell git explicitly. And of course you're going to have to remember that your idea branch doesn't point to idea on the remote, it points to "A" on the remote. – wadesworld May 18 '12 at 17:23
    
I've been using git-svn for a couple years. I'm more than comfortable with how git works locally. The problem is not a lack of understanding of how git works. I was getting tracking inheritance "for free" from git-svn, and now I don't. Oh well. I have a solution. Posting it. – ipmcc May 18 '12 at 18:31

Well, the simplest solution, but probably a partial solution,is to just do:

git checkout -b B <remote>/X
git merge A

where the second step is not needed if you've already pushed A back to X before needing B. Checking out B based on the remote sets up the tracking automatically.

As for one step:

function myGitCo () { git checkout -b $1 $3; git merge $2 }   # <smiley>
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Dusted off the ol' bash & perl scripting mojo and cooked up this solution, dropping it into a script called my-new-branch:

#/bin/bash
REMOTETRACKINGBRANCH=`git branch -vvv | perl -ne '/^\*[^\[]*\[[^:\]]+[:\]]+.*$/ && s/^\*[^\[]*\[([^:\]]+)[:\]]+.*$/\1/ && print;'`
if [ -z "$REMOTETRACKINGBRANCH" ];
then
    echo "ERROR: No remote tracking branch." 1>&2
    exit 1
else
    git checkout -b $1 && git branch --set-upstream $1 $REMOTETRACKINGBRANCH
fi

I'm sure this could be more brief, but I got sick of fighting with shell escaping the regular expressions and brute forced it using perl.

It would be nice if there were an easier-to-parse (and less likely to change as git revs) more plumbing-ish method to discern the remote tracking branch, but AFAICT the config file is authoritative for that bit of information, and parsing that seems like more of a pain than parsing git branch -vvv.

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