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I have the following code. why does this work? Is the casting necessary?

static public Food createMeal(Food f)
      throws Exception
  {

    if (f instanceof Bread)
    {
      return (Bread) f;
    }
    else if (f instanceof Meat)
    {
      return (Meat) f;
    }
    else if (f instanceof Milk)
    {
      return (Milk) f;
    }

    throw new Exception("NotAFood!");
  }
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You are asking us why it does work? Because bread, meat and milk all inherit from Food? –  JonH May 18 '12 at 14:44
    
why can I get away without no "else" for the why does this work part. –  stackoverflow May 18 '12 at 14:45
    
It might be better to make Bread, Meat and Milk implement the same interface (let say Meal) and only test if they are instance of this interface: if (f instanceof Meal) that would be more object oriented. –  olchauvin May 18 '12 at 15:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need else here because if previous condition was met then return would simply escape the whole method:

if (f instanceof Bread)
{
  return (Bread) f;
}
if (f instanceof Meat)
{
  return (Meat) f;
}
if (f instanceof Milk)
{
  return (Milk) f;
}

throw new Exception("NotAFood!");

And no, downcasting is not necessary here. In fact you can write equivalent function like this:

static public Food createMeal(Food f) throws Exception {
    if(f instanceof Bread || f instanceof Meat || f instanceof Milk) {
        return f;
    }
    throw new Exception("NotAFood!");
}
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Thanks Tomasz, This was very helpful –  stackoverflow May 18 '12 at 14:46

No, the downcasts are unnecessary and are effectively no-ops:

  1. the instanceof checks ensure that the downcasts can't fail;
  2. every downcast reference is immediately upcast back to Food by the return statements.

The function can be written more compactly like so:

  static public Food createMeal(Food f) throws Exception {
    if ((f instanceof Bread) || (f instanceof Meat) || (f instanceof Milk)) {
      return f;
    } else {
      throw new Exception("NotAFood!");
    }
  }

Having said this, the use of instanceof in conditional statements is often a sign of bad design. Imagine adding a new subclass of Food. Now you have to revisit every single place in your code that uses instanceof in this manner, and modify it appropriately.

A better design is to define a suitable virtual function in the base class, and override it in the derived classes.

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Thank you this was very helpful aix –  stackoverflow May 18 '12 at 14:48
    
How could I code this to return the instance of then? Example: if it was milk, then return milk object –  stackoverflow May 18 '12 at 14:50
    
@stackoverflow: In short, you can't. A function can only have one return type. –  NPE May 18 '12 at 14:51
2  
You don't, because you are limited to the one return type defined on the method (i.e. Food). If you wanted to cast down to Milk, then you would have to have a return type of Milk. –  Brad May 18 '12 at 14:54
1  
@stackoverflow, no factory classes generally return super types at a higher level of abstraction (e.g. Food in your example). It is then up to the calling code to cast down to a more specific class (e.g. Milk) if they want to use the methods available only to Milk –  Brad May 18 '12 at 14:55

So, if this compiles, it means that Milk, Bread and Meat are subclasses of Food (they "extends" Food). I'll assume this is the case. If that's so, then that's why that compiles.

Now, that means that Milk, Bread and Meat can be treated as Food, but deep inside they are different (i.e. one is Bread, one is Milk and one is Meat and each with its own peculiar member variables on top of those of a Food item)

In Java, the variable f accepts any Food and any subclass of Food. However, any Food you pass (this includes Meat, Milk and Bread) will be treated as a Food object with disregard for the specific kind of Food they are.

If you want to find exactly what kind of Food subclass they are, you can use the instanceof operator to find out and then take action. Then you would cast them to their actual specific type to call specific methods from those objects.

Your code: What you are doing is just returning an actual Food item, so the casting is not necessary. Java treats a Milk, Bread and Meat as Food by default and they can be returned in place of a Food item by default. On the other hand, if you wanted to access a specific property of a Meat, Bread or Milk object then you would need the cast. You would need to tell java that these f is not just a Food, but it is a Meat, Bread or a Milk. For example, if your Milk class had a getFatPercent() method, then you would need to do ((Milk)f).getFatPercent()

Assuming there can be more subclasses of Food, your code is equivalent to:

static public Food createMeal(Food f) throws Exception {
    if(f instanceof Milk || f instanceof Meat || f instanceof Bread)
        return f;
    else
        throw new Exception("Not a valid Food");
}
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Casting is not necessary. And no, you don't need an else after an else if. In fact else is always optional

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