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The C# team has previously considered adding extension properties, events, etc. to C#.

Per Eric Lippert:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/10/05/why-no-extension-properties.aspx

For these features to be useful however, they would have to be able to store some new kind of state with an object. It seems like the only way to do this would be to use a dictionary and associate each instance of an object with whatever the additional state is.

It would be useful if it were possible to copy this functionality "manually" by creating my own dictionary (and perhaps get/set extension methods). However, in order to associate a particular instance of an object with some state you would need to hash the actual reference to the object. In another language you might do this by hashing its memory location, however in C# that is not guaranteed to stay constant, and using unsafe code to accomplish this feature is far from ideal anyway.

Does anyone know if it's possible to get some hashable reference to an object that does not change as the object's internal state changes? There obviously is some internal mechanism to keep track of individual objects regardless of their memory location, but I'm not sure if that is exposed to user code.

Note: Simply hashing the object itself will not work at all, because GetHashCode() depends on an object's internal state not on which object it is.

Thanks for any insight.

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1  
Ugh, I like extension methods because they DON'T deal with the state of the object and are just syntax sugar, I'd be afraid doing anything more really blurs the lines too much... That said, it is an interesting thought, of course... –  James Michael Hare May 18 '12 at 14:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You're looking for the ConditionalWeakTable class.

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Wow. Another case of 'After 10 years of C#, I still discover things'. Thanks. –  KooKiz May 18 '12 at 14:58
1  
@KooKiz: Try the PluralizationService class –  SLaks May 18 '12 at 15:01
    
I am also amazed that I haven't seen this before. It looks like this works by casting to object and then calling RuntimeHelpers.GetHashCode (), (which does some runtime magic). Do you know the performance implications of using this class? –  MgSam May 18 '12 at 15:22
    
I wonder if this class was made specifically for the extension properties that were cut from C# 4.0. –  MgSam May 18 '12 at 15:23
    
@MgSam: The comments in the source say it was added for the DLR. –  SLaks May 18 '12 at 15:31

** WHOLE ANSWEr EDITED ** The properties are kept in a dictionary that uses weak reference to the objects as keys, and a dictionay with string-object pairs to store the properties and their values.

To set, get or delete properties for an object, the object is search in the weak references in the dictionary.

There could be two ways to dispose of the non-used properties:

  • check the IsAlive of the weak reference, and remove the entry in the dictionary if false
  • implement IDisposable in the "extendable" objects and call an extension method that removes the properties on the object being disposed.

I've included an optional using block in the sample code, so that you can debug and see how the Dispose calls the RemoveProperties extension method. This is of course optional, and the method would be called when the object is GC'ed.

Working sample of the idea, using WeakReference, static Dictionaries and IDisposable.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            using (PropertyLessClass plc = new PropertyLessClass())
            {
                plc.SetProperty("age", 25);
                plc.SetProperty("name", "John");
                Console.WriteLine("Age: {0}", plc.GetProperty("age"));
                Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}", plc.GetProperty("name"));
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

public class PropertyLessClass : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.DeleteProperties();
    }
}

public static class PropertyStore
{
    private static Dictionary<WeakReference, Dictionary<string, object>> store
        = new Dictionary<WeakReference, Dictionary<string, object>>();

    public static void SetProperty(this object o, string property, object value)
    {
        var key = store.Keys.FirstOrDefault(wr => wr.IsAlive && wr.Target == o);
        if (key == null)
        {
            key = new WeakReference(o);
            store.Add(key, new Dictionary<string, object>());
        }
        store[key][property] = value;
    }

    public static object GetProperty(this object o, string property)
    {
        var key = store.Keys.FirstOrDefault(wr => wr.IsAlive && wr.Target == o);
        if (key == null)
        {
            return null; // or throw Exception
        }
        if (!store[key].ContainsKey(property))
            return null; // or throw Exception
        return store[key][property];
    }

    public static void DeleteProperties(this object o)
    {
        var key = store.Keys.FirstOrDefault(wr => wr.IsAlive && wr.Target == o);
        if (key != null)
        {
            store.Remove(key);
        }
    }
}
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I think you're misunderstanding the question. –  MgSam May 18 '12 at 15:26
    
I think I do. I've added some text to my answer. –  JotaBe May 18 '12 at 15:40
    
Thanks for the response. One issue with this code though is that it uses weakly typed magic strings to represent property names. With extension methods on the class itself you can make get/set methods that don't suffer from that problem. –  MgSam May 18 '12 at 16:30
    
Using a dictionary like this actually makes this code slower. Instead, you should pass a custom IEqualityComparer<WeakReference>. –  SLaks May 5 '13 at 16:49
    
@SLaks. First, this is only a proof o concept. Second "premature optimization is the root of all evil". Is this really slow enough to make it neccessary to optimize it? This should be assesed before making the optimization. Third, how would you exactly implemente the dictionary and the IEqualityComparer to make it faster? I can't get your idea. –  JotaBe May 6 '13 at 8:56

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