Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Ran into an issue with generics and array types that I am unable to solve. It boils down to this. In the following code, how can I convert a generic List into an Array of the same generic type, while using a factory method ("T convert(String value)") to convert each individual element of the input generic List:

@Test
public void test(){
    List<String> integers = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3", "4");

    Integer[] integerArray = new TypeConverter<Integer[]>(Integer[].class).convert(integers);

    assertEquals(4, integerArray.length);
    assertEquals(1, integerArray[0].intValue());
    assertEquals(2, integerArray[1].intValue());
    assertEquals(3, integerArray[2].intValue());
    assertEquals(4, integerArray[3].intValue());
}

public class TypeConverter<T>{
    Class<T> type;

    public TypeConverter(Class<T> type) {
        this.type = type;
    }

    T convert(List<String> values){

        List output = new ArrayList();

        for (String value : values) {
            //have to use Object.class here since I cant get the non-array type of T:
            output.add(new TypeConverter(type.getComponentType()).convert(value));
        }

        return (T) output.toArray();
    }

    T convert(String value){
        //convert to an int;
        if(type == Integer.class){
            return (T) new Integer(Integer.parseInt(value));
        }
        return null;
    }
}

As you can see, my naive approach was to simply use the toArray Method, and cast the result like so:

(T) value.toArray()

but this results in a ClassCastException:

java.lang.ClassCastException: [Ljava.lang.Object; cannot be cast to [Ljava.lang.Integer

Is there a way to solve this that I am not seeing or should I take another approach?

Edit

Here's the concrete code that I am trying to fix. Specifically the visitArray() method:

https://github.com/johncarl81/transfuse/blob/master/transfuse/src/main/java/org/androidtransfuse/analysis/adapter/AnnotationTypeValueConverterVisitor.java

share|improve this question
    
    
I actually read that post before submitting my post. My question is not a duplicate because I am asking about the generics related to arrays. – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may use the alternate version of List.toArray that takes as a parameter the type of the array you want to get.

toArray Method

You may create an empty array with some method of the Array class.

Array.newInstance

So having the expected type you just use Array.newInstance(type, 0); and pass in the result to the toArray method.

Edit: Since your generic type is an array, you need to get the type of the components, try this:

Object[] array = (Object[]) Array.newInstance(type.getComponentType(), 0);
return (T) output.toArray(array);

Your value conversion method has a little something I'll let you figure out how to solve :)

Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
What would I pass into the toArray() method? – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:10
    
I'll add it on the edit, there you go! – Juan Alberto López Cavallotti May 18 '12 at 16:12
    
return (T) output.toArray(Array.newInstance(type, 0)); doesn't compile. Arraay.newInstance(type, 0) returns the type Object and List.toArray() requires an array type T[] – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:18
    
I'll create for you a sample implementation and edit the post. – Juan Alberto López Cavallotti May 18 '12 at 17:50
    
There you have, you only need to fix the string to integer conversion method in order the test to pass. – Juan Alberto López Cavallotti May 18 '12 at 18:05

Don't try to cast to T, try casting to T[], as you are handling an array of T's.

share|improve this answer
    
That is one possibility, but I was trying to aim at a more generalized solution. – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:11

I suggest ditching the reflection and reference arrays.

Slightly abusing inheritance:

public abstract class StringConverter<T> {

    public List<T> convert(List<String> values) {
        List<T> output = new ArrayList<>();
        for (String value : values) {
            output.add(convert(value));
        }
        return output;
    }

    public abstract T convert(String value);
}

public static StringConverter<Integer> toInteger() {
    return new StringConverter<>() {
        public Integer convert(String value) {
             return Integer.parseInt(value);
        }
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a sweet solution. And much nicer than having to have a convert() routine with a big if/else for all the types you want to handle. – QuantumMechanic May 18 '12 at 16:25
    
Tom, here's my problem, I don't have control over the return type of the method as I am implementing an interface. Here's the relevant code: github.com/johncarl81/transfuse/blob/master/transfuse/src/main/… – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:33
    
@johncarl If I were you, I wouldn't be starting from there... – Tom Hawtin - tackline May 18 '12 at 16:38
    
@TomHawtin-tackline what do you mean "starting from there"? Do you have a better solution in mind? – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:41
    
This made me take a step back find a solution using a similar technique you described. Thanks. – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 18:44

This works for me:

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.reflect.*;

public class Foo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Foo().test();
    }

    public void test(){
        List<String> integers = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3", "4");

        Integer[] integerArray = new TypeConverter<Integer>(Integer.class).convert(integers);

        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(integerArray));

    }

    public class TypeConverter<T>{
        Class<T> type;

        public TypeConverter(Class<T> type) {
            this.type = type;
        }

        T[] convert(List<String> values){

            List<T> output = new ArrayList<>();

            for (String value : values) {
                output.add(convert(value));
            }

            return output.toArray((T[]) Array.newInstance(type, output.size()));
        }

        T convert(String value){
            if(type == Integer.class){
                return (T) new Integer(Integer.parseInt(value));
            }
            else if(type == Long.class){
                return (T) new Long(Long.parseLong(value));
            }
            return null;
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very similar to what @Hidde was suggesting. – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:21
    
As you can see from the concrete example I added to the question, I not have control over the return type of the TypeConverter (AnnotationTypeValueConverterVisitor) as I am actually implementing an interface. Suggestions? – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:37

return (T) values.toArray(); should be return (T)output.toArray( new Integer[0])

no, you have to hard code new Integer[0]

share|improve this answer
    
how could I do this based on the type T or Class<T> type? – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:07
    
java generic can't do that, you see even java api do tricks like toArray( new Integer[0]). – J-16 SDiZ May 18 '12 at 16:07
    
In this contrived example this hardcoded approach would work, but I require a more generalized solution. – John Ericksen May 18 '12 at 16:14
    
no. the only alternate is do it like List.toArray(T[]). that is, pass in an array of target type..... Check the code of List.toArray(T[]). – J-16 SDiZ May 18 '12 at 16:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.